ITECH2001 Game Development Fundamentals

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ITECH2001
Game Development Fundamentals
CRICOS Provider No. 00103D ITECH2001 Major Assignment – Parts A, B and C Page 1 of 17
Major Assignment
Overview
Your task this semester will be to pitch, design and develop a small prototype for an original video game. Your
game must not be based on any existing artistic works or media, such as film, television, games, stories, or
characters – it should be your own creation.
This task is split into three manageable parts and described below in more detail. After reading below, and learning
through lectures and labs, if you are still unsure of complexity required, ask your lecturer and look at previous
completed parts from past semesters in the “Previous Student Examples” located in the Assessments section of
Moodle.
Learning Outcomes Assessed
The following course learning outcomes are assessed by completing this assessment:
• K3. Outline a common games mechanics model;
• K4. Relate how games can be used to enhance communications;
• K5. Identify the appropriate and correct syntax and programming constructs for different game
development requirements.
• S1. Select and apply appropriate games development approaches to solve a real world game design;
• S2. Create a range of assets for a game’s project;
• S3. Outline the design of a game’s project;
• S4. Use programming constructs to respond to user input and to create object and character behaviours;
• S5. Analyse, design and implement game concepts using structured and basic object orientated
programming concepts;
• S6. Test and debug code to correctly meet game design requirements.
• A1. Operate appropriate software packages to design and build games and interactive media products that
align with client and project expectations;
• A2. Utilise appropriate software environments to develop and integrate code implementations with game
assets.
Timelines and Expectations
Assessment Task
Time
Due Date
Weight
Part A: Game Pitch Video
Your Game Pitch is a video you record where you outline your
game idea. You will also provide constructive feedback to a peer.
5 hours
(minimum)
Sunday 11pm,
Week 4
10%
Part B: Game Design Document
Your Design Document will build upon the pitch, planning and
designing a small game prototype that you will develop
15 hours
(minimum)
Sunday 11pm,
Week 6
15%
Part C: Game Prototype
The Game Prototype will showcase your original game as one
small level or area, as described in your document
25 hours
(minimum)
Sunday 11pm,
Week 11
25%
ITECH2001
Game Development Fundamentals
CRICOS Provider No. 00103D ITECH2001 Major Assignment – Parts A, B and C Page 2 of 17
Part A: Game Pitch Video
This assessment contains two tasks:
1. Pitch a new video game concept in a short recorded video.
2. Provide constructive feedback to another student regarding their pitch.
The first task is to think of a new game idea, then pitch your game idea in a recorded video. This task is directly
related to the Assignments throughout the semester. The full details of what to do for this pitch are outlined below:
• Your game pitch forms the early concepts for the game prototype you will be designing for Part B, and then
building for Part C. Therefore, read over Part B and Part C below to gain a full understanding of the game
prototype you must plan through designs and then later develop into the small prototype.
o You should start your game design document for Part B early in the semester and have a good
idea of what your game will be about. This will help you immensely for this Game Pitch.
• A game pitch in industry is used to try to sell your game concept to a potential investor and their market, or
directly to the gaming target audience via crowdfunding; you want to them to fund your game!
o Therefore, it should be short, interesting and informative!
• Read these instructions thoroughly and think carefully about your pitch.
o Your game pitch will be a recorded video.
o Have fun with it! It is about games.
o It must meet the criteria and be between 1:30 to 2 minutes in length.
o It can be recorded and edited any way you like, but you must be
identifiable at the start of the video, and be talking throughout
to explain your game concept
o If recorded on a mobile device, it must be in landscape view 
and must be clear in video and audio.
• What to include in your video:
o Prepare a high level concept statement of your game idea, including a game title and game
genre. Use this to introduce your game idea during your pitch.
 Lecture 2 explains high concept statements, with a few examples.
o After your initial concept, summarise some background information such as potential and
interesting Characters (and/or Objects), Story (and/or Setting), and Game Mechanics.
o During your pitch, you must back up your discussion with supporting materials:
 Supporting materials can be anything that helps you to describe your game quickly:
• Examples: Sketches, images and/or videos
o Characters, objects, diagrams, ideas, game mechanics, and/or maps.
o They could be your own, or examples from similar games that inspire you.
 Supporting materials can be shown:
• In person during your pitch (record them clearly on the camera).
• Edited in to the pitch using any video editing software.
ITECH2001
Game Development Fundamentals
CRICOS Provider No. 00103D ITECH2001 Major Assignment – Parts A, B and C Page 3 of 17
The second task of this assessment requires you to watch other students’ game pitches and provide some
constructive feedback to at least one other student to help them improve their designs for Part B.
After posting your own video of your game pitch (see below on how to submit):
• Read the titles of other students’ game concepts and view some game pitch videos that appeal to you.
o If not many are available yet, wait a little closer to submission deadline for more to be uploaded
(but don’t forget about this!)
• When you discover an interesting game concept among your peers, reply to their forum post and
provide polite and constructive feedback about their concept that you believe may be able to help them
improve their concept when they work on Part B and eventually Part C.
For all forums remember:
• Text based communication can be misinterpreted. (eg: Sarcasm is not always obvious).
• Please obey discussion forum etiquette. Do not use the Moodle forums inappropriately.
Part A Submission
When you have completed your video, you must follow these steps:
• Note: Moodle generally has a 100mb attachment and upload limit. Therefore, you will use Kaltura to
compress your video and save it to Federation University Servers (instructions below).
• You will reply to the Assignment Part A: Game Pitch forum to submit your video.
• Click on the forum post the staff member has made for submitting your video.
• Click reply, and then choose the “Advanced” option below.
• When you reply, use the title of your game as the forum reply title.
• Within your reply, click on “Embed Kaltura Media” that looks like this >
• A new window will open.
• Click the “+ Add New” button.
• Click “Media Upload”.
• Click “Choose a file to upload” and select your video.
• After it finishes uploading, click
“</> Save and Embed”.
• At this point, your forum post will look
something like this >
• Now click “Post to forum” to submit
your video of your game pitch.
After submission, do not forget to provide feedback to another student’s game pitch video.
• You will not be able to view other students’ videos until 5 min after you have submitted your own.
• If you submit early, you may have
to come back later to see more
peer submissions.
• If you are having difficulty viewing
other submissions, switch the
forum to threaded form, so all
videos do not try to load at once.
ITECH2001
Game Development Fundamentals
CRICOS Provider No. 00103D ITECH2001 Major Assignment – Parts A, B and C Page 4 of 17
Part A Feedback
You will receive marks and feedback before the beginning of week 6, uploaded to Moodle.
Plagiarism:
Plagiarism is the presentation of the expressed thought or work of another person as though it is one’s own
without properly acknowledging that person. You must not allow other students to copy your work and must take
care to safeguard against this happening. More information about the plagiarism policy and procedure for the
university can be found at http://federation.edu.au/students/learning-and-study/online-help-with/plagiarism.
Part A Marking Rubric
Pitch
High
Concept
Statement
(2 marks)
Excellent (2)
One spoken
paragraph that gives
a very clear overview
of the game concept,
including its title and
the game genre. It is
very unique,
interesting and
persuasive!
Good (1.5)
One spoken
paragraph that gives
a clear overview of
the game concept,
including its title and
the game genre. It is
interesting, but could
be a little more
exciting.
Acceptable (1)
Roughly one spoken
paragraph that gives a
mostly understandable
overview of the game
concept, and its title
and game genre, but it
lacks excitement and
could be improved.
Poor (0.5)
The high concept
statement is
attempted but either
too short, too long,
and/or has confusing
game concepts
which are hard to
understand.
Presentation is dull.
Not Done (0)
The high concept
was not addressed,
and/or the pitch
goes directly into all
the details mixed
together.
Pitch
Background
Information
-Characters
(or) Objects
-Story
(or) Setting
-Mechanics
(2 marks)
Excellent (2)
Extremely clear to
understand with well
thought out ideas and
game concepts that
addresses all criteria.
It is very unique,
interesting and
persuasive!
Good (1.5)
Mostly understandable
with well thought out
ideas and game
concepts that
addresses all criteria. It
is interesting, but could
be a little more exciting.
Acceptable (1)
Ideas and game
concepts are mostly
understandable but
not well thought
through. Most
criteria addressed.
It could be a little
more exciting.
Poor (0.5)
Confusing ideas
and game concepts
which are hard to
understand. Few
criteria addressed.
It lacks excitement.
Not Done (0)
No background
information was
provided OR none
of what was asked
for.
Pitch
Supporting
Materials
-Images
-Sketches
-Videos
(2 marks)
Excellent (2)
At least four varied
supporting materials.
They greatly aid in
understanding the
game concepts.
Good (1.5)
At least three
supporting materials.
They aid in
understanding the
game concepts.
Acceptable (1)
At least two
supporting materials.
They somewhat aid
in understanding the
game concepts.
Poor (0.5)
There are additional
materials, but they
do not support the
understanding of the
pitched game
concepts.
Not Done (0)
No supporting
materials to assist
in visualising some
of the pitch.
Pitch
Length
(1 mark)
Good timing (1)
Between 1 minute 30 seconds and
2 minutes
OK timing (0.5)
1 to 30 seconds too short or
too long
Bad timing (0)
More than 30 seconds too short or
too long
Feedback to
Peer
(3 marks)
Excellent (3)
Feedback is very helpful and
constructive. It could easily
contribute towards peer
making beneficial changes to
their game design document.
Good (2)
Feedback is good but could
be more constructive to help
peer. Peer may consider the
feedback when working on
their game design document.
Poor (1)
Feedback was not constructive,
but could be understood. It
would be difficult for peer to use
the feedback when working on
their design document.
Not Done (0)
No feedback was
provided, OR it
was too vague,
OR could not be
understood.
ITECH2001
Game Development Fundamentals
CRICOS Provider No. 00103D ITECH2001 Major Assignment – Parts A, B and C Page 5 of 17
Part B: Game Design Document
A game begins with an idea. In your Game Pitch Video, you will have presented an idea for a new original game in
a short video that you want to design and prototype. Your task for Assignment Part B is to create the
documentation that expands upon the idea that you pitched, to create a more focused game design
document as a plan for your game prototype. In the Assignment Part C, you will use your designs to develop a
single-player prototype of your game – so your game design document needs careful thought and planning.
You must follow these rules while designing your game:
• Your game must be an original design
o You can be inspired by, and make a game similar to, but not copy an existing artistic work.
o You cannot base your characters, story, or world on an existing artistic work or other form of existing
media. It must be an original creation of your own, or it may be considered plagiarism.
• Your game must be a single player game
o Multiplayer and online games require too much development time, so your game should be single
player based, unless you can convince the lecturer otherwise.
• You must focus on a game where the player controls a single character, vehicle or object, etc.
o In games where you control more than one character or object, like a squad or entire armies, they
often contain complex systems and programming requirements making this too difficult a task for a
single semester.
• You must focus on a small prototype that is manageable to build this semester
o Just one or two game scenes / levels with a few triggered events is enough for this course.
 See Part C for more details about requirements of scene(s) and events.
• You should design your game as a 3D game
o All of the lab work supports learning how to develop games in 3D.
o You can still create a game in a 2D style that is actually 3D, by positioning the camera angle
appropriately (side view, top down, isometric, orthographic etc). See different examples here.
o You are not restricted from designing and developing a pure full 2D game, but you need to get
approval from the lecturer. It is recommended that you work in 3D, unless you have previous
experience using the Unity game engine and feel capable of self-learning 2D game development.
• Try to avoid complex mechanics and systems in your designs and development
o Remember this is a one semester course, with a small amount of time to produce the outcomes.
This game design document does not have a word count requirement, but
• Expect to write more than 2000 words to address all of the criteria outlined further below.
• Include images to support your designs!
• Your design document should be easy to understand, visualise, and be detailed enough that if you were to
pass your design to a completely separate developer, you could expect them to develop your prototype for
the game well.
ITECH2001
Game Development Fundamentals
CRICOS Provider No. 00103D ITECH2001 Major Assignment – Parts A, B and C Page 6 of 17
The following areas should be addressed in your game design document:
• Game Overview
o High Concept Statement (see lecture 2 for more details regarding high concept statements)
 This is a concise but informative description of your game concept. A few sentences (one
paragraph) to summarise your game in an exciting manner – sometimes called an “Elevator
Pitch” – a short and persuasive pitch that quickly defines the value and excitement in your
product.

This can be directly from your Part A: Game Pitch Video, but you may need to improve this if
your pitch was unclear in any way. Use the feedback provided in the forum from peer
critiques, and from staff marking to make improvements
o Game Genre (see lecture 1 for more details regarding game genres)
 Discuss the genre(s) of the game you are designing, and where your game fits in.
 Discuss the main inspiration(s) for your game, and explain their importance as an inspiration.
o Highlights – Discuss the highlights of your game that are used to attract and engage the player. How
would a marketing team describe your game?
o Include images/diagrams to help support your descriptions.
• Story and Characters (see lecture 3 for more details regarding game story, structure and characters.)
o Note that some game concepts may not have a distinct story or characters, you must still complete
this section! Read below on what to include here:
o If your game prototype will have a distinct plot and characters, include:
 Story / Narrative – summarise the plot for your game prototype.
 Backstory – outline the backstory that leads to the plot in your game prototype.

Main Characters – all main characters should be discussed (the player avatar and any
friendly and/or enemy characters that will be in the prototype)

Make sure to include their Name, Archetypes and Traits.
 You can relate some discussion to Goals, Obstacles, and Conflicts, 3 Act structure, Hero’s
Journey, and/or Interest Curves if it helps.
Include images/diagrams to help support your descriptions.

o If your game prototype will NOT have a distinct story and characters (For example: abstract
concepts, vehicles instead of characters, etc.), include:
 Goals, Obstacles, and Conflicts – discuss each of these that the player will encounter in
your game prototype.

Interest Curves – outline how the game prototype will keep the player’s interest in relation to
interest curves.
Main Objects – all main sentient objects should be discussed (the player avatar, and any
friendly and/or enemy sentient/computer-controlled objects)


Make sure to include their Name, Type and Function.

Include images/diagrams to help support your descriptions.
ITECH2001
Game Development Fundamentals
CRICOS Provider No. 00103D ITECH2001 Major Assignment – Parts A, B and C Page 7 of 17
• Mechanics (see lecture 4 for more details regarding game mechanics)
o Every student will have game mechanics to discuss regardless of whether their planned game
prototype has a distinct story, characters, other objects, or is a more abstract concept.
o There should be thorough discussions of each of these aspects from the lecture
 Space to play the prototype within.
 Time conditions for the prototype.
 Objects, their attributes & states (should be a list of all objects for the protoype).
 Actions that can be conducted in the prototype.
 Rules of the game. Explain what will be available in the prototype.
 Skill required of the player to create challenge
 Chance that creates uncertainty in your prototype.
o Include images/diagrams to help support your descriptions.
• Level Design (see lecture 5 for more details regarding world and level design)
o It is important that you thoroughly outline the level or contained area you will develop for your Part C
playable prototype. This will help the marker determine if your scope is too large and therefore difficult,
or simply too small, in which they can provide feedback. You must include the following.
o Game world / setting / environment – Outline the setting for your prototype level / scene.
o Complete diagram / map – include a map or diagram of the proposed level / scene design for the
prototype, including indications of what occurs within different parts of that prototype level / scene.
o Progression through the level / scene of the player.
 What events will occur?
 What will trigger these events?

(for more details about triggers and events, see Part C)
 Where do certain actions need to be used?
 Where are the objects / characters located?

Relate all of these points back to the diagram / map.
o It may be a good idea to include basic algorithms or pseudocode to indicate how the triggered
events will work. This will greatly help with Part C.
o Include images/diagrams to help support your descriptions.
Images: Be sure to support all sections with either images sourced online and/or created by yourself. All images
downloaded from an online source need to be referenced appropriately.
ITECH2001
Game Development Fundamentals
CRICOS Provider No. 00103D ITECH2001 Major Assignment – Parts A, B and C Page 8 of 17
Part B Submission
Electronic copies via Moodle. Adobe PDF or Word Doc / Docx accepted.
Please refer to the “Course Description” for information regarding; late assignments, extensions, special
consideration, and plagiarism. Guide to writing and referencing: https://federation.edu.au/currentstudents/learning-and-study/online-help-with/guides-to-your-assessments
Part B Marking
Your design document should be easy to understand, visualise, and be detailed enough that if you were to pass
your design to a completely separate developer, you could expect them to develop your prototype for the game
well.
In order to deliver a good design document, aim for higher to 2000 words. If your document is less than this, it will
be hard for you to describe each section as thoroughly as is required.
Refer to the rubric on the next page for details on how each section of the document will be marked.
Part B Feedback
You will receive marks and feedback within two weeks of submission, uploaded to your Moodle submission.
Plagiarism:
Plagiarism is the presentation of the expressed thought or work of another person as though it is one’s own
without properly acknowledging that person. You must not allow other students to copy your work and must take
care to safeguard against this happening. More information about the plagiarism policy and procedure for the
university can be found at http://federation.edu.au/students/learning-and-study/online-help-with/plagiarism.
ITECH2001
Game Development Fundamentals
CRICOS Provider No. 00103D ITECH2001 Major Assignment – Parts A, B and C Page 9 of 17
Part B Marking Rubric
Criteria
Details
Overview (3 marks)
High Concept Statement
(1 mark)
Should only be a few sentences to a paragraph to summarise the main aspects of the game. See
the example in the specifications above.
Excellent (1)
Excellent, exciting and
informative description of
the game concept in a
concise way that sums up
many aspects.
Good (0.75)
Easy to understand
description of the game
concept in a concise way
that sums up many
aspects.
Acceptable (0.5)
Adequate description of
the game concept that
sums up some aspects,
but could be shorter or
longer.
Poor (0.25)
Confusing description of
the game concept that is
difficult to follow, much
too short, or much too
long.
None (0)
No high
concept
visible.
Game Genre
(1 mark)
Genre of the game they are designing should be clear and understandable, with main inspirations, their
importance, and accompanying images.
Excellent (1)
Comprehensive discussion
of the intended game
genre, that is clear and
easy to understand,
supported by many
existing games in the
genre.
Good (0.75)
Substantial discussion of
the intended game genre,
that is clear and easy to
understand, supported by a
few existing games in the
genre.
Acceptable (0.5)
Moderate discussion of the
intended game genre, which
is mostly understandable,
supported by at least one or
two existing games in the
genre. It could use a bit more
details at times.
Poor (0.25)
Limited discussion of
the intended game
genre, which is at
times difficult to
understand, with no
support from other
games in the genre.
None
(0)
Genre
missing.
Highlights
(1 mark)
It should be clear what is going to hook and engage the player to begin and continue playing, and what the peak
highlights of their game prototype will be.
Excellent (1)
Comprehensive discussion
of many highlights in your
game that are clear and
easy to understand,
supported by examples
from existing games.
Good (0.75)
Substantial discussion of
some highlights in your
game that are clear and
easy to understand,
supported by examples
from existing games.
Acceptable (0.5)
Moderate discussion of a
few highlights in your game
that are mostly
understandable, with
support from at least one
existing game. It could use
a bit more details at times.
Poor (0.25)
Limited discussion of
highlights in your
game, which is at
times difficult to
understand, with no
support from other
games.
None (0)
Highlights
missing.
Story and Characters (2 marks)
Story
(1 mark)
(Students with distinct Story) Must be clear what the narrative/plot and backstory is for the prototype.
(Students without distinct Story) Must be clear what the goals, obstacles and conflicts are, and also the interest
curves for the player within the prototype.
Excellent (1)
Comprehensive discussion
that is clear and easy to
understand that includes:
• Story / Narrative OR
Goals, Obstacles and
Conflicts
• Backstory OR
Interest Curves
Good (0.75)
Substantial discussion
that is mostly clear and
easy to understand of
all the following:
• Story / Narrative OR
Goals, Obstacles and
Conflicts
• Backstory OR
Interest Curves
Acceptable (0.5)
Moderate discussion that is
mostly understandable, but
could use more details at
times:
• Story / Narrative OR
Goals, Obstacles and
Conflicts
• Backstory OR
Interest Curves
Poor (0.25)
Limited discussion, which
is at times difficult to
understand, with not much
supporting detail of
• Story / Narrative OR
Goals, Obstacles and
Conflicts
• Backstory OR
Interest Curves
None (0)
Story
section
missing.
Characters
(1 mark)
(Students with distinct Characters) Main characters are detailed, including name, archetype and traits.
(Students without distinct Characters) Main sentient objects are detailed, including name, type and function.
Excellent (1)
Comprehensive
discussion that is clear
and easy to understand
that includes:
• All Main Characters
OR
All Main Objects
• Name, Archetype,
Traits OR
Name, Type, Function
Good (0.75)
Substantial discussion
that is mostly clear and
easy to understand of all
the following:
• All Main Characters
OR
All Main Objects
• Name, Archetype,
Traits OR
Name, Type, Function
Acceptable (0.5)
Moderate discussion that
is mostly understandable,
but could use more
details at times:
• All Main Characters
OR
All Main Objects
• Name, Archetype,
Traits OR
Name, Type, Function
Poor (0.25)
Limited discussion, which
is at times difficult to
understand, with not
much supporting detail of
• All Main Characters
OR
All Main Objects
• Name, Archetype,
Traits OR
Name, Type, Function
None (0)
Character
section
missing.
ITECH2001
Game Development Fundamentals
CRICOS Provider No. 00103D ITECH2001 Major Assignment – Parts A, B and C Page 10 of 17
Criteria
Details
Mechanics (3.5 marks)
Mechanics
(each type of worth 0.5
marks x 7 types)
Game mechanics should be clear and descriptive, with focus on the seven types:
1.Space to play within / 2.Time conditions / 3.Objects, their attributes & states
4.Actions that can be conducted / 5.Rules of the game / 6.Skill required to create challenge
7.Chance that creates uncertainty
Excellent (0.5 each x 7)
Comprehensive
discussion of this
mechanic that is clear
and easy to understand.
Good (0.4 each x 7)
Substantial discussion of
this mechanic that is
mostly clear and easy to
understand
Acceptable (0.25 each
x 7)
Moderate discussion of
this mechanic that is
mostly understandable
but could use more
details at times.
Poor (0.1 each x 7)
Limited discussion of this
mechanic, which is at times
difficult to understand,
and/or with not much
supporting details.
None (0
each x 7)
Mechanic
type is
missing.
Level Design (5 marks)
Level Discussion
(3 marks)
This section needs to detail the level or contained area, including the setting and environment, and
the proposed progression through the prototype for the player
Excellent (3)
Comprehensive
discussion that is clear
and easy to understand
that includes:
• Setting/Environment
• Progression through
prototype
• Events, Triggers,
Objects, & Characters
It gives a solid point to
begin developing the
prototype
Good (2.25)
Substantial discussion
that is mostly clear and
easy to understand of all
the following:
• Setting/Environment
• Progression through
prototype
• Events, Triggers,
Objects, & Characters
It gives an OK starting
point to begin
developing the prototype
Acceptable (1.5)
Moderate discussion that
is mostly
understandable, but
could use more details at
times:
• Setting/Environment
• Progression through
prototype
• Events, Triggers,
Objects, & Characters
It will take a little effort to
translate this into a
prototype scene
Poor (0.75)
Limited discussion, which
is at times difficult to
understand, with not much
supporting detail of:
• Setting/Environment
• Progression through
prototype
• Events, Triggers,
Objects, & Characters
It will take a lot of effort to
translate this into a
prototype scene
None (0)
Level Design
discussion
missing.
Level Diagram / Map
(2 marks)
This is marked separately to the image criteria and must detail the layout of the level / scene using
a student created diagram or map of the area. It must be clear what occurs within the diagram /
map at different locations
Excellent (2)
Comprehensive diagram
/ map that details the
prototype scene
including all objects,
triggers, and events
within the scene.
It gives a solid point to
begin developing the
prototype.
Good (1.5)
Substantial diagram /
map that outlines the
prototype scene
including all objects,
within the scene.
It gives an OK starting
point to begin
developing the
prototype.
Acceptable (1)
Adequate diagram / map
that outlines the
prototype scene but
could use more attention
to detail.
It will take a little effort to
translate this into a
prototype scene.
Poor (0.5)
Diagram / map is limited in
detail, and/or is hard to
make sense out of.
It will take a lot of effort to
translate this into a
prototype scene.
None (0)
Diagram /
map is
missing from
Level Design
section.
Images (1.5 marks)
Supporting Images within
(1.5 marks)
All sections should be supported by images and/or diagrams. When mention of an existing
game is made, it must be backed up by a supporting image to make it clear.
Excellent (1.5)
All sections are
supported by multiple
images/diagrams both
created and sourced
online. When mention of
an existing game is
made, it is backed up by
a supporting image.
Good (1.1)
All sections are
supported by at least
one image/diagram both
created and sourced
online. When mention of
an existing game is
made, it is backed up by
a supporting image.
Acceptable (0.75)
Most sections are
supported by at least
one image sourced
online. When mention of
an existing game is
made, it is backed up by
a supporting image.
Poor (0.4)
Supporting images exist,
but only in a couple of
places OR they are of poor
quality that is difficult to
see clearly OR have little
relation to the text.
None (0)
No
supporting
images.
ITECH2001
Game Development Fundamentals
CRICOS Provider No. 00103D ITECH2001 Major Assignment – Parts A, B and C Page 11 of 17
Part C: Game Prototype
After your game pitch, you will written a game design document for Part B that discusses your prototype plans in
detail. Using your game design document, you must now develop a small functional prototype that
showcases one scene (that acts as a small area or level).
How big should the prototype be?
• Your prototype should use one scene in Unity with a few triggers and events to showcase elements of your
game idea. Additional scenes are allowed, however focus on perfecting one scene first.
• Here are some examples of different prototypes:
o Lab 9-10 – this is a good example of a prototype for this course for a platform game in 3D. It has
running, jumping, a trigger to open a door, a trigger to increase player speed, a trigger to spawn
enemies, collisions to cause death, and events causing enemies to patrol a simple pattern.
o Lecture 8 example – this is an OK example of a prototype with triggers and events causing
characters to respond and output dialogue on the screen interface.
o Also view the previous student prototypes available in Moodle.
• Examples for different genres:
o RPG: an option would be to showcase a small village with a few characters you can talk to, with a
couple of game mechanics – rather than showcasing an intricate RPG combat system.

RPG: Alternatively, an option could be to focus only on the combat aspect, with some sort of
experience point interface event as you defeat enemies.
o Shooter or Racing: the markers will probably expect that your prototype will have at least some
shooting or racing respectively. But do not forget that the assignment also requires events, such as
time limits, scores, and/or collisions to trigger an event.
o Platformer: at a minimum some platforms and jumping should be involved in your prototype, and
events such as time limits, scores, enemy patrols, and/or collisions to trigger the event.
What are event and triggers?
• You will learn more about these in lectures 6 to 10, as well as some labs from 5 to 10.
o Essentially, an Event is when something happens that causes a certain piece of code to run.
 The event is said to have been triggered by something in the game.
• Examples to trigger an event in Unity:
o Input supplied by the player via controls or interface selections.

Eg: Push a key to open a door, pick up an object, or throw a grenade.
o Two (or more) objects (with collider components) collided.

Eg: Player touches an enemy and gets hurt. Player stands on a switch and a door opens.
Player picks up a coin, and their score increases.
o Player touched a triggerable collider (through a collider component).

Eg: Player enters an area and enemies spawn, or a person talks to them.
o Artificial Intelligence programmed to execute code regularly.

Eg: Enemy scripted to moves towards the player slowly. Enemy has a set patrol path.
Remember: the core mechanics and scripted events of your game will really show proof of your game
concept in the prototype assignment.
ITECH2001
Game Development Fundamentals
CRICOS Provider No. 00103D ITECH2001 Major Assignment – Parts A, B and C Page 12 of 17
Beginning Part C:
• Download the “3D Project Template” from Moodle in the Part C section of Assessments.
o (If you have been approved to create a 2D game, download the 2D Project Template instead)
• Unzip the file to a safe location.
• You should see a folder called “StudentID-GameName”.
• Rename that folder to your actual student number followed by the name of your game. This is your
Prototype project folder.
o (example: 30126565-ThunderRun).
• Take note of the location of your Prototype project folder.
o You will need it for adding the project to the Unity Hub and,
o Upon completion of your assignment you need to zip this entire project folder for submission.
• Open Unity Hub.
• Click Add.
• Browse to the folder location, and click on your named Prototype project folder, then click “Select
Folder”.
• It should now be in the list of Projects in the Unity Hub.
• Click on the name of your Prototype project to load it into Unity for editing.
• In the Project Tab folders have
already been set up for you.
(depending on Unity preferences,
your project tab will look like one of
the screenshots to the right) 
• You must store Assets in these
folders as outlined below:
o Downloaded Assets – To store any external assets downloaded from the internet / Unity asset
store. Assets that you did not create yourself.
o My Self-Created Assets – To store assets you create yourself for your game. Materials, Sprites,
Interface art, 3D Models, Prefabs, Terrain, etc. If you did not create it yourself, do not place it in this
folder or its child folders.
 4 x Art Assets – to store the 4 required self-created Art Assets.
 Scripts – to store any C# scripts that you have created yourself.
 Scenes – This folder already contains a scene called “MainScene”. Your main prototype
scene must be built in this scene. You should also store any additional scenes you make if
required.
o Packages – created by default for Unity. Do not remove, but you can ignore it during development.
To ensure consistency and standards for markers:
• You MUST download the zipped project template from Moodle and begin your prototype on that file.
o If you do not use this file as the starting point for your prototype, your assignment will
NOT be marked.
• You MUST use Unity version 2019.2.17f1 to edit your project. It is available in Moodle to download.
o If you do not use Unity version 2019.2.17f1 to edit your project, your assignment will
NOT be marked.
ITECH2001
Game Development Fundamentals
CRICOS Provider No. 00103D ITECH2001 Major Assignment – Parts A, B and C Page 13 of 17
Part C Requirements:
There are a number of requirements that you must adhere to when completing this assessment task:
• You MUST download the zipped project template from Moodle and begin your prototype using that file.
• You MUST use Unity version 2019.2.17f1 to develop your prototype. It is available in Moodle to download.
o Do not use any other game engine or version of Unity.
• Art Assets – self-developed
o It is expected that you can develop your own 2D and 3D art assets that are appropriate for your
game dimension (2D or 3D). Remember that creating a 3D game is highly recommended.
 2D games must have at least four 2D assets (not just primitive shapes) created by yourself.
Static sprites, world terrain and interface art are the most likely choices here.
 3D games should have at least four assets (not just primitive shapes) created by yourself in
2D (materials and/or interface art), 3D (meshes), and/or even a world terrain (3D level mesh
or Unity terrain).
 All art assets you create MUST be placed in your “4 x Art Assets” project folder in Unity.
• If you create more than 4, please place them in this folder also.
 All art assets you create need to be listed in your report (see next page).
o GIMP can be used to develop 2D assets (see Lab 1 for GIMP instructions).
 You can use alternatives like Photoshop for your assignment but there will be no labs
exploring this alternative.
o Blender can be used to develop 3D assets (see Labs 2 and 3 for Blender instructions).
 You can use alternatives like 3ds Max or Maya for your assignment but there will be no labs
exploring these alternatives.
o Unity can be used to develop a Terrain (see Lab 6 for Unity 3D Terrain). Primitive objects can be
placed in Unity, but will receive a low score, unless arranged into an elaborate scene.
• C# Scripts – self-developed
o It is expected that you can develop your own scripts to create new events and behaviours in your
prototype (see Labs 4 to 10, and Lecture Projects 8 and 10, regarding developing simple games and
triggered events in Unity).
 All scripts you create MUST be placed in your “Scripts” project folder in Unity.
o The controllers that come in the Standard Assets package are useful and can be used in your
prototype to control characters, objects, and/or vehicles, but you must create your own triggers
and/or collisions.
o For the highest scripting marks, you need at least 3 self-created triggers/collisions. 2 or less will
reduce your marks, as per the marking rubric.
• Other Assets – sourced online
o Unity has a huge library of over 5000 free premade assets you can import and use, and not limited
to just art assets (see Labs 4 to 10 regarding Unity and Moodle Resources links to free assets).
o It is acceptable to source additional external assets if needed, but they should be completely free to
use (under Creative Commons 0 licensing) and MUST be linked to in your brief report.
o External premade assets sourced online MUST be placed in your “Downloaded Assets” project
folder in Unity. This includes Unity’s own “Standard Assets”.
o External premade assets source online should be used appropriately within your prototype.
ITECH2001
Game Development Fundamentals
CRICOS Provider No. 00103D ITECH2001 Major Assignment – Parts A, B and C Page 14 of 17
• Game Prototype Development:
o Take note of the rules first established for the prototype in Part B on page 5 of this document.
o Scene(s) & Objects – Begin working on your prototype scene with the Prototype template (as
outlined on page 12 of this document), and the scene called “MainScene”.
 Aim for gngaging use of Objects (your own four created assets, plus additional sourced free
assets) including 3D objects (or 2D sprites and backgrounds) such as the player, props,
cameras and light sources to create your scene.
 These objects will have components and scripts attached to create the mechanics of your
game, and multiple instances of the same object should be created from prefabs
o Materials (3D only) – placed on game Objects to distinguish them apart from one another.
o Layers (2D only) – if you are approved to build a 2D game, layers should be used appropriately to
distinguish foreground, middle ground and background elements.
o Components – Components should be added to your game Objects where appropriate such as an
Animator, Rigidbody, Collider, Particle System, Audio, etc.
 Transform is a required component and is not considered for marking purposes.
o Scripts – Written in C#. At a minimum, scripts must be used to give user control over the player
character/object, and create one event.


Three triggerable and/or collision events will gain the highest mark.
Ideally, you will use Scripts to trigger multiple events, collision detection and control the
interface elements below.
o UI (User Interface) Elements – At least one Unity UI element such as UI Text and Buttons, which
should be scripted to control their functionality. Try to make it visually pleasing.
 Examples: scoring system, ammunition left, chat dialogue or another interface element.
• Brief Report
o You should also submit a report detailing what you have done. A template is provided on Moodle
to make this easier for both you and your marker. This must briefly address:
 A list of art assets that you developed yourself, and any premade assets (such as Unity’s
standard asset packages and free assets from the Unity store) or external assets (found
online) used in the project and their source.
 An overview of all of the scripts which have been created and which game object(s) each
one is attached to.
 Any limitations or known bugs in the game. Unacknowledged bugs detected during marking
will be taken as evidence of insufficient testing. Bugs that have been documented in this
report will receive more leniency in marking than those that are unacknowledged.
 Any major aspects of the game which have changed since your game design document,
explaining why this has occurred.
 A list of events and gameplay actions that can occur in your prototype.
Plagiarism:
Plagiarism is the presentation of the expressed thought or work of another person as though it is one’s own
without properly acknowledging that person. You must not allow other students to copy your work and must take
care to safeguard against this happening. More information about the plagiarism policy and procedure for the
university can be found at http://federation.edu.au/students/learning-and-study/online-help-with/plagiarism.
ITECH2001
Game Development Fundamentals
CRICOS Provider No. 00103D ITECH2001 Major Assignment – Parts A, B and C Page 15 of 17
Part C Submission
When you downloaded the project template for this assignment from
Moodle, you should have renamed the project as your student number
followed by the name of your game (example: 30126565-ThunderRun).
• Locate this Unity project folder.
• If you are not sure where you placed it:
o Open your project in Unity.
o Right-click on Assets from the Project tab.
o Click “Show in Explorer”.
o Your Project folder contents will display.
• ZIP the Unity game prototype project folder (the entire contents
will be zipped with it)
If you do not submit your complete Unity Project folder (the source project folder/files that the marker
can open within the Unity engine), many criteria of your assignment cannot be marked!
We need to be able to view everything (objects, components, scripts, etc.) in close detail!
Note: Moodle only accepts a maximum of 100mb files for submission.
• If your Project ZIP file is below 100mb:
o Submit the ZIP file and your Brief Report to Moodle.
• If your Project ZIP file exceeds 100mb:
o Upload the ZIP file to your Federation University OneDrive account and share publicly to Staff
and Federation University
 Full instructions to do this are located in the Assignment Part C submission.
o Submit your Brief Report to Moodle and provide a OneDrive link to the ZIP file within your
Brief Report as per the instructions.
Part C Marking
The marking rubric on the next page assumes that everything in your prototype is working – except prototype
features you have specified in your report as a known bug or limitation of your prototype that was too difficult to
fix. For example, if a game mechanic is broken, objects collide with no event triggered, or an interface element
does not update correctly, then the awarded score for that element may be lower (depending on your report and
the complexity of the unfixed problem) than if it was working.
Firstly, markers will look at what you have developed by looking at the pieces that make up your assets and
scene(s), as well as how all the objects come together appropriately in your scene(s). The marks are also based
on the level of complexity introduced in the lab work. For example, if you developed 3D models yourself that are
as complex as or more so than the lab 3 Treasure Chest 3D model, you will score high.
Secondly, markers will actually play through and review your prototype. Creativity is awarded up to two
marks for going beyond our expectations. Your unique mechanics and aesthetics will also play a part in
determining if your prototype is worth a higher score than just simply replicating a scene similar to the lab work.
Part C Feedback
The marking rubric on the next page shows a scale from excellent to poor, and a zero for not meeting a criteria.
Read it carefully to aim for higher grades. You will receive marks and feedback within two weeks of submission,
uploaded to your Moodle submission.
ITECH2001
Game Development Fundamentals
CRICOS Provider No. 00103D ITECH2001 Major Assignment – Parts A, B and C Page 16 of 17
Part C Marking Rubric
Criteria
Details
Self-Developed Art Assets
(4 marks max)
Four self-made assets are required. These assets can be identified via the report.
Acceptable assets include: 2d sprites/pixel art (for 2d games), 2d textures for 3d models (for 3d
games), 2d graphics for interface components (for 2d or 3d games), 3d models (for 3d games),
Terrain (For 3d games), Level geometry built in 2d or 3d (for 2d or 3d games).
Excellent (4)
• At least 4 self-created assets.
• Great 2D art with shading and
pseudo 3D (like lab 1 tree and
human figure).
• Complex high quality 2d
textures (for 3d models) or
interface art.
• 3D models with multiple parts
at the complexity of the
treasure chest (lab 3).
• Interesting terrain and features
(like lab 6), but unique (not
using standard terrain assets).
• 2D or 3D geometry
constructed into very
interesting area.
Good (3)
• At least 3 self-created
assets.
• Decent 2D objects with
some shading
• Decent quality 2d textures
(for 3d models) or interface
art.
• 3D models that are at the
complexity of the gold coin
and potion bottle (lab 3).
• Interesting terrain and
features (like lab 6) using
mostly standard assets.
• 2D or 3D geometry
constructed into interesting
area.
Acceptable (2)
• At least 2 self-created assets.
• OK looking 2d art, but could
easily be improved (like the
cube in lab 1 – unless
intentional creative design).
• Decent quality 2d textures for
3d models but visible seams.
• OK 3D models with some
complexity beyond primitive
shapes, such as the gazebo
(lab 2).
• OK looking terrain, standard
textures but a little barren.
Room for improvement.
• 2D or 3D geometry
constructed into usable area.
Poor (1)
• Only 1 self
created asset.
• Very simple 2D
art.
• Very simple 3D
models, like a
few primitive
shapes pieced
together.
• Pretty flat
uninteresting
barren terrain.
• Flat and poor
looking 2d
textures for 3d
models.
None (0)
• No
self
created
assets.
Scene(s) & Objects
(2 marks max)
How all the objects come together appropriately in your scene(s) – this is in relation to the
complexity the labs went to.
Excellent (2)
• Scene well-constructed with
great placement of objects
to fill out the prototype area.
• Good use of Prefabs.
• More interesting than lab
scenes.
Good (1.5)
• Scene well-constructed
with good placement of
objects but could still be
improved.
• Good use of Prefabs.
• As good as lab scenes
Acceptable (1)
• Scene could use more
attention and objects to
fill out the prototype.
• OK use of Prefabs.
• Could be improved to
lab quality.
Poor (0.5)
• Scene exists but is
lacking in thought and
object placement.
• Prefabs not used well.
• Not representative of
this course level.
None (0)
• Scene
missing
or
empty.
Materials (3d) or
Layers (2d)
(1 mark max)
(3d only) Materials should be considered at a placeholder prototype level.
(2d only) Layers should be used appropriately to distinguish foreground, middle ground and
background elements
Excellent (1)
• Materials applied appropriately to distinguish objects from
one another and match the object.
• Layers used to separate foreground, middle ground and
background elements
Acceptable (0.5)
• Some materials are applied appropriately,
while some objects have odd or no materials.
• Layers used to separate at least foreground
and background
None (0)
• No materials on
objects.
• Single layer
used.
Components
(2 marks max)
Components should be used on objects appropriately, such as: Rigidbody (physics), Colliders
(physical), Colliders (triggers), Text/Buttons (UI), Animators (object animation), etc.
Excellent (2)
• Excellent use of many
components to control
physics, collisions, triggers,
UI, audio, etc. Objects act as
expected.
Good (1.5)
• Good use of most
components to control
physics, collisions,
triggers, UI, audio etc.
Objects act as expected
most of the time.
Acceptable (1)
• Passable use of some
components to control physics,
collisions, triggers, UI, audio,
etc. Some objects may act
unexpectedly.
Poor (0.5)
• Components are
used, but objects
are not acting as
the player would
expect.
None (0)
• No
comp
onents
on
objects.
ITECH2001
Game Development Fundamentals
CRICOS Provider No. 00103D ITECH2001 Major Assignment – Parts A, B and C Page 17 of 17
Criteria
Details
Scripts
(6 marks max)
Must be C#. Are used to for Player Controllers and/or interface control, to Trigger Events, for
Collision Events, and to update the Interface.
Excellent (6)
• Well-chosen or created
player controller.
• Player and interface works
as expected all of the time.
• Great use of at least 3
student-created triggers
and/or collisions to create
multiple game events.
Good (4.5)
• Well-chosen or
created player
controller.
• Player and interface
works as expected
most of the time.
• Good use of at least 2
student-created
triggers and/or
collisions to create
multiple game events.
Acceptable (3)
• Appropriately used or
created player controller
• Player and interface
works as expected some
of the time.
• At least a single use of a
student-created trigger
and/or collision to create
a game event.
Poor (1.5)
• Student has not created
any scripts, but they
have appropriately used
a pre-built player
controller.
• Triggers and/or
collisions not created by
the student.
None (0)
• No working
scripts on
objects.
Interface
(2 marks max)
A basic on-screen interface is expected such as Text interface (eg. score, health, bullets) and
possibly buttons (as the labs shown)
Excellent (2)
• Visible on-screen interface
works and updates
appropriately via script.
Designed impressively.
Good (1.5)
• Visible on-screen
interface works and
updates appropriately
via script. Designed a
bit more interesting
than default UI styles.
Acceptable (1)
• Visible on-screen
interface works and
updates appropriately via
script. Designed with
default UI styles.
Poor (0.5)
• Visible on-screen
interface is implemented
but is static and does
not update via script.
None (0)
• No visible
on-screen
interface at
all.
Game Mechanics
(2 marks max)
Review of the actual game mechanics at a proof of concept level (it should somewhat reflect a
playable game)
Excellent (2)
• Excellent mechanics show
off great attention to
gameplay and address the
proof of game concept.
Good (1.5)
• Good mechanics to
relevantly address the
proof of game
concept.
Acceptable (1)
• Passable mechanics that
give an indication of the
proof of game concept.
Poor (0.5)
• Some mechanics are
present but hard to
identify if they address a
proof of concept.
None (0)
• No working
mechanics.
Aesthetics
(2 marks max)
Aesthetics should be unique and interesting to support the design of your game. Replicating labs
aesthetic is worth less marks.
Excellent (2)
• Excellent unique
aesthetics relevant to your
game world.
Good (1.5)
• Good and somewhat
interesting aesthetics
relevant to your game
world.
Acceptable (1)
• Aesthetics are relevant
to your game world, but
lack originality or are
very similar to labs.
Poor (0.5)
• Aesthetics are of low
quality, they represent
poor design and lack
originality.
None (0)
• Scene
missing or
empty.
Creativity
(2 marks max)
Creativity should reflect all unique aspects of the game. If you go beyond the labs, creativity should
be awarded higher.
Excellent (2)
• Has gone beyond
expectations of the labs
with a very creative and
unique prototype.
Good (1.5)
• Produced upon the
expectations set out in
the labs but with some
interesting and
creative aspects.
Acceptable (1)
• Produced similar content
to the expectations set
out in the labs, but with a
little of your own
creativity.
Poor (0.5)
• Prototype lacked in
creativity and was very
similar to the lab work.
None (0)
• Scene
missing or
empty.
Brief Report
(2 marks max)
Report should have all sections filled out. All sourced assets require a link to the exact source
webpage.
Excellent (2)
• Uses template with all
sections filled out with
thorough detail.
Good (1.5)
• Uses template with all
sections filled out
appropriately.
Acceptable (1)
• Uses template but
criteria could be
addressed more clearly.
Poor (0.5)
• Does not use template
and/or addresses criteria
poorly.
None (0)
• No report
submitted.

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