patients and two possible medical procedures

FIND A SOLUTION AT Academic Writers Bay

Consider the simple hypothetical example in Table 1. This example involves patients and two possible medical procedures labeled 0 (Drug) and 1 (Surgery). Table 1 displays each patient’s potential outcomes in terms of years of post-treatment survival under each treatment.
Patient
Y1
Y0
1
8
1
2
5
7
3
5
1
4
6
8
5
4
2
6
10
2
7
1
10
8
4
6
9
3
7
10
9
5
What is the average treatment effect for surgery compared to drug? Which type of intervention is more effective on average?
Suppose that there is some “perfect doctor” who through expertise or magic knows each patient’s potential outcomes and then chooses the optimal treatment for each patient. If she assigns each patient to the treatment more beneficial for that patient, which patients will receive surgery and which will receive the drug treatment? Calculate the average treatment effect both for the group who received surgery and the group who received drug treatment.
Assume that the “perfect doctor” has assigned each patient to his or her own optimal treatment. Calculate the naïve average treatment effect for surgery using that observable information? How does this differ from the ATE?
Decompose the naïve average treatment effect into the baseline and differential effects biases. In your own words, what is the cause of the difference between the “real” average treatment effect of surgery and the naïve estimate you obtained?
What is the “fundamental problem of causal inference” in this context?
Take a coin and flip it ten times. If heads on the first flip, unit 1 is assigned to drug and if tails it is assigned to surgery. If heads on the second flip, unit 2 is assigned to drug and if tails it is assigned to surgery. And so on. Calculate the

Order from Academic Writers Bay
Best Custom Essay Writing Services

QUALITY: 100% ORIGINAL PAPERNO PLAGIARISM – CUSTOM PAPER