Play and Development Workplace Effectiveness

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Assessment Workbook 4
CHC30113 Certificate III in
Early Childhood Education and Care
Play and Development
V3.4 Produced 08 July 2020
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Compliant Learning Resources
Date
Summary of modifications made
Version
30 April 2013
Version 1 final produced following assessment validation.
V1.0
27 May 2014
Amendments made to Part E, Question 3 regarding the wording
V1.1
27 October 2014
Amendments made to Part E, Question 3 regarding the wording
V1.2
17 November 2014
Changes made throughout document
V2.0
9 December 2014
Significant Changes made to document following validation
V3.0
18 July 2016
Updated unit mapping and formatting
V3.1
23 August 2017
Added url to hyperlink
V3.2
26 February 2020
Made changes to Child Observation Form B. Updated the link in the workbook.
V3.3
08 July 2020
Renamed the link for Child Observation Form B.
V3.4
Table of Contents
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Instructions 4
What is competency based assessment 4
The basic principles of assessing nationally recognised training 5
The dimensions of competency 6
The unit of competency 7
Assessment Requirements 12
Reasonable Adjustment 12
Assessment Methods 13
Presentation 14
Assessment Workbook Coversheet 15
Knowledge Assessment 16
Part A – Holistic Development 16
Part B – Support Play and Learning 28
Part C – Use Information about CHildren 30
Part D – Respectful and Positive with children 33
Part E – Support Behaviour 37
Case Study A – Holistic Development 44
Case Study B – Develop positive and respectful relationships with children 46
Case Study C – Understanding Children Behaviour 49
Project – Observing, Gathering and Analysing Information 54
Workbook Checklist 61
Feedback 62
Instructions
Some questions cover underpinning knowledge content and concepts. These questions are all in a short answer format. The longer questions requiring the application of concepts are covered in the other assessments. You must answer all questions using your own words. However you may reference your learner guide, and other online or hard copy resources to complete this assessment.
If you are currently working as part of an Early Childhood Education/Child Care team, you may answer these questions based on your own workplace. Otherwise consider what you should do if you were working as part of an Early Childhood Education/Child Care team.
What is competency based assessment
The features of a competency based assessment system are:
It is focused on what learners can do and whether it meets the criteria specified by industry as competency standards.
Assessment should mirror the environment the learner will encounter in the workplace.
Assessment criteria should be clearly stated to the learner at the beginning of the learning process.
Assessment should be holistic. That is it aims to assess as many elements and/or units of competency as is feasible at one time.
In competency assessment a learner receives one of only two outcomes – competent or not yet competent.
The basis of assessment is in applying knowledge for some purpose. In a competency system, knowledge for the sake of knowledge is seen to be ineffectual unless it assists a person to perform a task to the level required in the workplace.
The emphasis in assessment is on assessable outcomes that are clearly stated for the trainer and learner. Assessable outcomes are tied to the relevant industry competency standards where these exist. Where such competencies do not exist, the outcomes are based upon those identified in a training needs analysis.
The basic principles of assessing nationally recognised training
Developing and conducing assessment, in an Australian vocational education and training context, is founded on a number of basic conventions:
The principles of assessment
Assessment must be valid
Assessment must include the full range of skills and knowledge needed to demonstrate competency.
Assessment must include the combination of knowledge and skills with their practical application.
Assessment, where possible, must include judgements based on evidence drawn from a number of occasions and across a number of contexts.
Assessment must be reliable
Assessment must be reliable and must be regularly reviewed to ensure that assessors are making decisions in a consistent manner.
Assessors must be trained in national competency standards for assessors to ensure reliability.
Assessment must be flexible
Assessment, where possible, must cover both the on and off-the-job components of training within a course.
Assessment must provide for the recognition of knowledge, skills and attitudes regardless of how they have been acquired.
Assessment must be made accessible to learners though a variety of delivery modes, so they can proceed through modularised training packages to gain competencies.
Assessment must be fair and equitable
Assessment must be equitable to all groups of learners.
Assessment procedures and criteria must be made clear to all learners before assessment.
Assessment must be mutually developed and agreed upon between assessor and the assessed.
Assessment must be able to be challenged. Appropriate mechanisms must be made for reassessment as a result of challenge.
The rules of evidence (from Training in Australia by M Tovey, D Lawlor)
When collecting evidence there are certain rules that apply to that evidence. All evidence must be valid, sufficient, authentic and current;
Valid
Evidence gathered should meet the requirements of the unit of competency. This evidence should match or at least reflect the type of performance that is to be assessed, whether it covers knowledge, skills or attitudes.
Sufficient
This rule relates to the amount of evidence gathered It is imperative that enough evidence is gathered to satisfy the requirements that the learner is competent across all aspects of the unit of competency.
Authentic
When evidence is gathered the assessor must be satisfied that evidence is the learner’s own work.
Current
This relates to the recency of the evidence and whether the evidence relates to current abilities.
The dimensions of competency
The national concept of competency includes all aspects of work performance, and not only narrow task skills. The four dimensions of competency are:
Task skills
Task management skills
Contingency management skills
Job role and environment skills
The unit of competency
Each unit of competency can be unbundled to reveal two key assessment components:
the performance criteria
specifying the required level of performance
the evidence guide
Describing the underpinning knowledge and skills that must be demonstrated to determine competence. It provides essential advice for assessment of the unit of competency in the form of the assessment criteria.
The assessments in this workbook cover four units of competency below:
CHCECE010 Support the holistic development of children in early childhood
Support physical development
Support social development
Support emotional development
Support cognitive development
Support communication development
Create an environment for holistic learning and development
Application
This unit describes the skills and knowledge to support and recognise the interrelationship between the physical, social, emotional, cognitive and communication development of children from birth to 6 years of age.
This unit applies to educators working in a range of early childhood education and care services.
Performance Evidence
The candidate must show evidence of the ability to complete tasks outlined in elements and performance criteria of this unit, manage tasks and manage contingencies in the context of the job role. There must be demonstrated evidence that the candidate has completed the following tasks at least once:
supported the development of children in at least three different situations/activities (including different age groups and abilities), including:
interacting with children to holistically support development and learning appropriate to the child’s abilities and age
providing a variety of experiences and environments to support the different areas of children’s development (including a combination of physical, creative, social, emotional , language and cognitive)
performed the activities outlined in the performance criteria of this unit during a period of at least 120 hours of work in at least one regulated education and care service.
Knowledge Evidence
The candidate must be able to demonstrate essential knowledge required to effectively do the task outlined in elements and performance criteria of this unit, manage the task and manage contingencies in the context of the work role. These include knowledge of:
code of ethics
United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child
how to access:
the National Quality Framework
the National Quality Standards
the relevant approved learning framework
and how to navigate through framework and standards documents to find areas relevant to this unit of competency
introductory-level child development for children, including:
early brain development
importance of the early years for subsequent educational success
foundational knowledge of developmental theory
aspects of poor early childhood development, such as:
poor diet
lack of play
limited stimulation of brain development
lack of materials and resources
inconsistent or non-existent emotional support or comfort
trauma
other life experiences which interrupt appropriate childhood activities, and their potential long-term harmful impacts
biological and environmental influences on development
symbol systems including letters, numbers, time, money and musical notation.
CHCECE013 Use information about children to inform practice
Gather information about the child through observation
Gather information about the child from secondary sources
Record observations appropriately
Use observations and information collected to contribute to program planning
This unit describes the skills and knowledge required to gather information about children through observation and other sources as a basis to inform program-planning cycles and to share with children and their families.
This unit applies to educators working in a range of education and care services.
Performance Evidence
The candidate must show evidence of the ability to complete tasks outlined in elements and performance criteria of this unit, manage tasks and manage contingencies in the context of the job role. There must be demonstrated evidence that the candidate has completed the following tasks: observed, documented and analysed information regarding at least three children of varying ages, including: gathering and recording information using: observations questioning discussion with families anecdotal information learning stories jottings digital images samples of children’s work analysing observations of the children’s behaviour, including: aspects of child’s development knowledge, ideas, abilities and interests social interactions reactions to play environment writing reports that record observations accurately and respectfully to the level of detail expected in the service using information to contribute to program/planning.
Knowledge Evidence
The candidate must be able to demonstrate essential knowledge required to effectively do the task outlined in elements and performance criteria of this unit, manage the task and manage contingencies in the context of the work role. These include knowledge of: how to access: the National Quality Framework the National Quality Standards the relevant approved learning framework how to navigate through standards and framework documents to find areas relevant to this unit of competency United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child code of ethics reflective practice child development, in order to analyse information and plan accordingly observation techniques report-writing standards and protocols relevant to the context of observation reports organisational standards, policies and procedures.
Further information including the unit description, performance criteria and assessment standards are available.
CHCECE006 Support behaviour of children and young people
Contribute to a safe and supportive environment
Use positive support techniques
Observe and collect data to assist with development of appropriate strategies for support
Implement strategies to support children or young people who require additional support
Monitor and review strategies
Application
This unit describes the skills and knowledge to apply strategies to guide responsible behaviour of children and young people in a safe and supportive environment.
The unit applies to workers in a range of community service contexts.
Performance Evidence
The candidate must show evidence of the ability to complete tasks outlined in elements and performance criteria of this unit, manage tasks and manage contingencies in the context of the job role. There must be demonstrated evidence that the candidate has completed the following tasks: communicated issues to a supervisor and negotiated solutions in a clear and appropriate manner at least twice guided behaviour using positive support techniques with at least two children and/or young people discussed behaviours of children and/or young people to plan and problem-solve in collaboration with others recorded observations and identified behaviours requiring support of children and/or young people using a range of methods used judgement to determine when to involve other staff for supported intervention.
Knowledge Evidence
The candidate must be able to demonstrate essential knowledge required to effectively do the task outlined in elements and performance criteria of this unit, manage the task and manage contingencies in the context of the work role. These include knowledge of: definitions of and differences between disruptive behaviour and behaviours of concern how learning difficulties or mental health issues may affect behaviour impacts of environment and culture on behaviour of children and/or young people communicative function of behaviour and positive support strategies to redirect behaviour and defuse situations organisational standards, policies and procedures.
CHCECE007 Develop positive and respectful relationships with children
Communicate positively with children
Interact positively with children
Support and respect children
Maintain the dignity and rights of children
Application
This unit describes the skills and knowledge required by educators working with children to ensure they can develop and maintain effective relationships and promote positive behaviour.
This unit applies to educators who work with children in a range of education and care service settings.
Foundation Skills
The foundation skills described those required skills (language, literacy and numeracy) that are essential to performance.
Oral communication – in order to engage in sustained conversations with children. The remaining foundation skills essential to performance are explicit in the performance criteria of this unit.
Performance Evidence
The candidate must show evidence of the ability to complete tasks outlined in elements and performance criteria of this unit, manage tasks and manage contingencies in the context of the job role. There must be demonstrated evidence that the candidate has completed the following tasks at least once: communicated positively and respectfully and interacted effectively with at least three children, including: active listening consideration of a child’s age, activities, interests, culture and needs interpreting non-verbal cues of children responding to distress in ways that meets the child’s need communication of care and respect through all interactions assessed and responded appropriately to behaviours of concern encouraged children to respect similarities and differences between each other involved and encouraged children in decision-making and planning performed the activities outlined in the performance criteria of this unit during a period of at least 120 hours of work in at least one regulated education and care service
Knowledge Evidence
The candidate must be able to demonstrate essential knowledge required to effectively do the task outlined in elements and performance criteria of this unit, manage the task and manage contingencies in the context of the work role. These include knowledge of: how to access: the National Quality Framework the National Quality Standards the relevant approved learning framework how to navigate through framework and standards documents to find areas relevant to this unit of competency effective communication techniques including verbal and non-verbal ways to show respect techniques to guide children’s behaviour United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child organisational standards, policies and procedures.
Assessment Requirements
Context of and specific resources for assessment:
This unit can be assessed independently, however holistic assessment practice with other community services units of competency is encouraged
Resources required for assessment include access to:
An appropriate workplace and/or simulation of realistic workplace setting where assessment can take place
Relevant organisation policy, protocols and procedures
Critical aspects for assessment and evidence required to demonstrate this unit of competency:
The individual being assessed must provide evidence of specified essential knowledge as well as skills
This unit will be most appropriately assessed in the workplace or in a simulated workplace and under the normal range of workplace conditions
It is recommended that assessment or information for assessment will be conducted or gathered over a period of time and cover the normal range of workplace situations and settings.
Reasonable Adjustment
Adapted Reasonable Adjustment in teaching, learning and assessment for learners with a disability – November 2010 – Prepared by – Queensland VET Development Centre
Reasonable adjustment in VET is the term applied to modifying the learning environment or making changes to the training delivered to assist a learner with a disability. A reasonable adjustment can be as simple as changing classrooms to be closer to amenities, or installing a particular type of software on a computer for a person with vision impairment.
Why make a reasonable adjustment?
We make reasonable adjustments in VET to make sure that learners with a disability have:
the same learning opportunities as learners without a disability
the same opportunity to perform and complete assessments as those without a disability.
Assessment Methods
Assessment for this unit will be assessed through completion of Assessment Workbook Four (4) and Assessment Workbook Seven (7) Skills Journal – Play and Development
Workbook Four will focus on two assessment methods:
Written Questions – based on the required knowledge component as described in the Instructions for Assessment
Case Studies – utilising the Sparkling Stars virtual Education and Care Service and activities set out in this workbook.
Further Assessments:
Workbook Seven (7) Skills Journal – Play and Development: participant must attend a Vocational Placement
Presentation
Things to Consider:
Only submit your workbook once all activities inside are complete. Should you have any questions regarding your assessments, or not understand what is required for you to complete your assessment, please feel free to ask your trainer. Keep your answers succinct and make sure you are answering the question. Re-read the question after you have drafted up your response just to be sure you have covered all that is needed. Your final assessment result will either be competent or not yet competent.

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If submitting your assessments please ensure that
All assessment tasks within the workbook have been completed
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Answering the Questions:
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Assessment Workbook Coversheet
WORKBOOK:
WORKBOOK 4
TITLE:
Play and Development
FIRST AND SURNAME:
     
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Read the Candidate Declaration below and if you agree to the terms of the declaration sign and date in the space provided.
By submitting this work, I declare that: I have been advised of the assessment requirements, have been made aware of my rights and responsibilities as an assessment candidate, and choose to be assessed at this time. I am aware that there is a limit to the number of submissions that I can make for each assessment and I am submitting all documents required to complete this Assessment Workbook. I have organised and named the files I am submitting according to the instructions provided and I am aware that my assessor will not assess work that cannot be clearly identified and may request the work be resubmitted according to the correct process. This work is my own and contains no material written by another person except where due reference is made. I am aware that a false declaration may lead to the withdrawal of a qualification or statement of attainment. I am aware that there is a policy of checking the validity of qualifications that I submit as evidence as well as the qualifications/evidence of parties who verify my performance or observable skills. I give my consent to contact these parties for verification purposes.
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Knowledge Assessment
Part A – Holistic Development
Nutrition is extremely important in relation to a child’s brain development. Explain how adequate nutrition before a child’s birth is important. Explain how adequate nutrition after a child’s birth is important.

Development of the brain along with the immunity of the child majorly occurs during the time of pregnancy. The neuron of the brain starts to developing in the third week of pregnancy. There are evidences with the need of high level of nutrition for the mother during pregnancy that is needed in the development of the nascent stage of brain. Poor level of nutrition in the brain can thus affect lifetime memory formation of child. It is also about the immunity development that occurs in the foetus stage. Hence the dietary requirement of protein needs to be very high during pregnancy.
Adequate level of nutrition is needed in the early childhood stage. This can help in weight management and developing proper nutritional balance within the body. There is high risk of malnutrition and for immunity if there is no adequate nutrition given during childbirth.
As an Early Childhood educator it is essential that you support the brain development of all children in your care. Explain in 4-5 sentences, the importance of discussing children’s interests with them, in order to stimulate early brain development. Guidance: Refer to the National Quality Standards and the relevant approved learning framework to support your answer.

As per the research guidelines of National Quality Standard, it is important to focus on the experience in the early childhood days that help in the rapid brain development. With better experience in the early days, it is possible to incorporate new skills within the child which can be learned at a faster rate in the young days. The rapid rate of synapse development stays at the top during the first 5 years after birth. National Quality Standard thus recommends to provide all types of experience so that it is possible for the learners to get idea about the actual skill set of every child
Explain in 4-5 sentences, the importance of using your observations of children to support their development. Guidance: Refer to the National Quality Standards and the relevant approved learning framework

By proper observation of the child care expert according to the National quality standard, it is possible to understand the interest area of every child. This can be the output of how every child responds in situations, which is the key element in deciding their skill set for the future. Observation is also one of the key assessment processes of the educator in understanding the improvement in every child and areas, where they need to work on. At the same time it is also important to keep constant interaction with the child that can help them to clear situation and understand strength and weakness of child
Explain in 4-5 sentences, the importance of using routines as opportunities to foster children’s independence. Guidance: Make sure you refer to the National Quality Framework in your answer

Routines also foster a child’s independence, by allowing them the opportunity to make decisions independently. This is needed to make the child understahd the importance of following daily life routine. Here, the National quality farmework says that all child with having the sense of responsibility is needed in their personal growth. This can also help the child in their journey towards adulthood.
In 4-5 sentences, explain the importance of encouraging children to explore the environment and biological resources, in order to positively influence learning and development. Guidance: Make sure you refer to the National Quality Framework in your answer.

Encouraging children to explore the environment and natural resources can help them in developing brain activities. They also learn the importance of nature and society also the ways human life is interconnected with the ecosystem. Children can also gain confidence while spending time with biological resources as it creates an essence of positivity in the subconscious level. Nature is also regarded as one of the best places to practically understand the things taught in theoretical lessons in childhood. Seeing and witnessing the things in real life can help them develop interest in their respective subject and also provide them with the thinking ability to protect environment for future.
As an Early Childhood educator it is essential that you provide play and learning experiences that support the growth of children across all developmental domains. Complete the tables as instructed for each developmental domain: Physical development – Name at least one (1) piece of equipment, game or toy you could use to support children’s fine motor, gross motor and fundamental movement skills.

Equipment
Games
Toys
Fine motor development
Writing tools
Drwaing games
Crayons
Gross motor development
Bicycle
Bicycle race
Kids bicycle
Fundamental movement skills
Play ball
Play with the ball
Plastic ball
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Emotional/Psychological development – List three (3) decision-making opportunities in the table below, that you can provide to children to help support their emotional and psychological development.
c)

Decision-making opportunities
1
Decision to make psychological counselling at every individual child, which will help the educated to understand the interest and potential of every child. The result of the counselling can therefore be used in making better plan for children development
2
The educator needs to make a decision of creating a safe environment, where children can explore their skill set and improve knowledge.
3
Decision to improve communication plan for children, where they will be able to express out very emotional and psychological desires. This will also help them in improving their confidence and communication with elders.
Foundational Knowledge of Developmental Theory: Language development – Complete the table below listing three (3) experiences you can provide to children that will expose them to different forms of language and literature and two (2) experiences that will give children the opportunity to express themselves through language.
d)
Experiences that give exposure to a range of language forms
1
Using a variety of props and objects as a part of the playing that is aimed to improve their educational skills in language. This can also help in improving their imagination and vocab skills.
2
Combining multiple roles and themes that can help in their role play activities. This can help in their communication skill and better understanding of different types of situation in practical life.
3
Solving crossword puzzles at primary level can help them in increasing thinking ability about different kinds of word formation and their practical applicability.
Expressive language experiences
1
Books, especially the pictorial or wordless books can help in expressive language skills by developing the sense of objects and their respective meaning from real life experience.
2
Cooking is also considered to be one of the effective way to enhance expressive language through sensing
Creative development – Fill out the table below, by indicating at least one (1) experience you could provide for children to use each of their senses and to express themselves in order to support their creative development.
e)

Experience
Visual
Helping them to develop drawing skills is a best way to enhance visual sense as it will make children develop picture in their own mind and express it out through drawings
Hearing
Making them participate in audio games and memory based activities can enhance their concentration and listening ability.
Taste
Balanced diet nutrition should be kept in the children meal plan. Diet plan should be kept in record and at the same time how every child is reacting to different types of food.
Touch
This can be done by using different types of material in children’s playing element. At the same time it is also important to enhance the muscle growth and ensure that every material are non toxic to children
Smell
For the development of sense of smell, children should be introduced to various natural objects having different types of odour. This can be a variety of natural objects like rose, lemon etc. Playing activities can also be introduced like recognition of the object by the smell. This can also enhance cognitive skills of the children.
Self-expression
It is important to create a positive environment and compassion for children, it will help them to express their emotions. At the same time, they can also help to encourage children in communication programs that I will help them to inform about their issues and likings.
Cognitive development – Write at least one (1) problem-solving experience you can provide to support the cognitive development of children in each of the following age groups: 0-2 years, 3-5 years and 6-12 years.
f)

Experience
Problem-solving (0-2yrs)
Children can be encouraged to take part in pictorial and deduction games, where real life objects are used to distinguish.
Problem-solving (3-5yrs)
At this stage children should be encouraged to take jigsaw puzzle games, where they will be provided with attractive incentives in successful solving of the puzzles
Problem-solving (6-12yrs)
During this stage children should be encouraged to learn a new language and solve the primary level of mathematical equations. This can help in development of the brain at early stage and increase the thinking ability for their future.
Consider a cultural activity that encourages the use of home languages and family contributions that can be done within the centre. Write a paragraph of 5-7 sentences, discussing the following points: Ensure you cover the following points for your chosen activity: Briefly describe or name your chosen activity. How does your activity value and encourage the use and acquisition of home languages? Which age group you have planned the activity for? What focus should the introduction and implementation of the activity have? What could you do to involve the children in group discussions? What could you do to encourage contribution from the children’s family? How does encouraging family’s diverse contribution to learning activities benefit children?

     
Fill out the table below giving the name of a relevant theorist and a summary of the relevant theory of child development.

Developmental Theory
Theorist
Summary of Theory
Physical Development
Erikson’s Psychosocial Developmental Theory
Erikson’s eight-stage theory of psychosocial development describes growth and change throughout life, focusing on social interaction and conflicts that arise during different stages of development. Hence using the terms of the theory, it is possible to plan the development of child depending upon each stage of life.
Cognitive Development
Piaget’s Cognitive Developmental Theory
This theory suggests that cognitive development occurs at various mental stages and experiences encountered by an individual. This theory can be used to develop and provide enhanced experience to children. Each part of the brain is developed according to experience given to the children.
Emotional /Psychological Development
Behavioral Child Development Theories
According to the behavioral perspective, all human behavior can be described in terms of environmental influences.
Social Development
Bandura’s Social Learning Theory
Social learning theory is based on the work of psychologist Albert Bandura. Bandura believed that the conditioning and reinforcement process could not sufficiently explain all of human learning. Bandura’s child development theory suggests that observation plays a critical role in learning, but this observation does not necessarily need to take the form of watching a live model.
Language Development
Vygotsky’s Theory of thought, Language, and Culture
This theory focuses on the importance of individual culture and its implication in children’s life. It is important to understand the social relationship between two individuals, which needs to be incorporated within children at a very early age.
In your own words, explain why creativity is important to child development.

Creativity is important at the development of each stage of children along with their learnings. The best part of creativity is that it provides an opportunity for children to express how their skill set and feelings from the surroundings. They also get the opportunity to generate new ideas, which is needed in development of the cognitive and problem solving skills. It has been seen children, who are able to have better creative scales, have an open mind and are able to make use of the same to increase their ability in problem solving.
The incorporation of activities that stimulate a child’s creativity is an essential part of a centre’s program. Which part of the national standards supports this? Guidance: Quote the quality area and standard. What learning outcome of the relevant learning frameworks supports this? Guidance: Quote the framework and learning outcome.

a) Early Years Learning Framework
b) This framework is implemented by the government of Australia which enhances and supports the learning requirement of children at an early age. The framework of the standard is based on a national quality framework, which ensures that the childhood sector and their academic requirements are fulfilled as a part of national curriculum. The framework also enhances children’s experience in building their personality and education
Describe in your own words: What is Blooms Taxonomy? What are the six cognitive skills revised by Krathwohl in 2000?

a) Bloom’s taxonomy developed by Benjamin Bloom in 1956 as a part of learning outcomes for children. There are six levels of teaching method which are involved in children’s education and learning. 1. The first level is remember, children need to memorise poems and other lessons 2. The second level is to understand, where children need to distinguish between different objects. 3. Third level is application, where students need to apply the lesson in real life. 4. Fourth level is analyse, where student need to have the capability to use their thinking ability to analyse things 5. The fifth level is to evaluate, where children need to learn about making judgement based on situation. 6. The sixth and the final level is to create, where children can make their own space with understanding of real life situations.
b) 1. Remembering: Retrieving, recalling, or recognizing 3. Applying 4. Analyzing 5. Evaluating 6. Creating…2. Understanding
Describe in your own words: Who proposed Multiple Intelligence Theory? How could you include it in learning experiences? What are the nine intelligences?

a) Howard Gardner
b) Multiple intelligence theory is one of the main and best ways to increase the IQ of children. With the application of this theory it is possible to develop multiple skills within a child as a part of their growth curriculum. It is therefore possible for a child to explore different aspects of their skills and creativity and understand the exact area of interest
c) 1. Visual-Spatial Intelligence 2. Linguistic-Verbal Intelligence 3. Logical-Mathematical Intelligence 4. Bodily-Kinesthetic Intelligence 5. Musical Intelligence 6. Interpersonal Intelligence 7. Intrapersonal Intelligence 8. Naturalistic Intelligence
In 4-5 sentences, explain the importance of the early years and early development, in relation to a child’s subsequent educational success.

The early years are crucial for the development of a secure emotional attachment and the skills that help children succeed in life. Promoting and developing these skills along with strengthening families are important ways to improve long term outcomes for children. Supporting families and parents through innovative strength-based parent education programs have been successful and help improve parent-child relationships while also preventing child maltreatment. Important components of these programs include engaging parents in the development of their children, focusing on positive parenting and child behaviors, and learning strategies for better managing stress.
Fill out the table below in relation to aspects of poor early childhood development and the potential long term impacts it can have on a child.
Aspects of poor early childhood development
Long term harmful impacts
Poor Diet
Malnutrition and lack of physical development
Lack of Play
Poor brain and physical development
Limited Stimulation of brain development
Poor cognituive and analytical skill
Lack of Materials and resources
Lack of understanding in natural objects
Inconsistent or non-existent emotional support or comfort
Poor communication skill
Trauma
Mental health issues
The table below indicates, two other life experiences, aside from the factors listed in the above table that may interrupt appropriate childhood activities. List their potential long-term harmful impacts.

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Potential Long-term harmful impacts
Serious illness or condition/hospitalisation
Can give rise to chronic disease
Loss of parent/family through divorce/death or displacement
Mental trauma and deprsession
Part B – Support Play and Learning
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9. How would you use reflective practice in ‘providing experiences to support children’s play and learning’?
Most of the educators use their reflective practice in enhancing their support in children discovery in understanding the potential. The educator needs to reflect upon their personal decision by evaluating the children progress in every decision making. Regular progress evaluation is one of the best ways to understand and reflect upon the decisions.
How does the United Nations Convention of the Rights of the Child relate to ‘Providing experiences to support children’s play and learning’?

Article 31 “That every child has the right to rest and leisure, to engage in play and recreational activities appropriate to the age of the child and to participate freely in cultural life and the arts. That member governments shall respect and promote the right of the child to participate fully in cultural and artistic life and shall encourage the provision of appropriate and equal opportunities for cultural, artistic, recreational and leisure activity.”
Fill out the table below: Identify common organisational standards, policies and procedures that are relevant to a childcare centre. (List 2 of each)

Standards:
i Child protection policy
ii Health Hygiene and safe food policy
Policies:
  The National Standard        
National Law and National regulations
Procedures:
Get Up & Grow: Healthy Eating and Physical Activity for Early Childhood
Move We Move Program
This question has been intentionally left blank. Please proceed to the next question.
Part C – Use Information about CHildren
Fill out the table below in relation to the United Nations Convention of the Rights of the Child and Code of Ethics and explain the purpose of each. Guidance: Access the United Nations Convention Website and the Early Childhood Australia Code of Ethics website.

Purpose
United Nations Convention of the Rights of the Child
The purpose is to deepen understanding of a particular aspect of the Convention, and to reflect the changing conditions under which children grow up.
Early Childhood Australia Code of ethics
As an aspirational document, it does provide a basis for critical reflection, a guide for professional behaviour, and principles to inform individual and collective decision-making.
Which section of the Educators Guide to the EYLF refers to using theories of child development, in order to analyse information and plan accordingly? Note the page numbers of this section.

EYLF Refering To Theories Of Child Development
Which section of the Educators Guide to the MTOP refers to using theories of child development, in order to analyse information and plan accordingly? Note the page numbers of this section.

     
Describe in your own words how you can use observations on child development and analyse a child’s information to assist in planning?

With proper observation by the educated it is possible to collect information about a child’s progress in learning. Information can be collected also through evaluation of a child’s progress report. This information can be used in future planning for improvement in the existing education curriculum and learning process of the child.
In the table below, provide a description of the following observation techniques and outline what they are best used to observe.

Observation Technique
Description
Best Use
Anecdotal
Cognitive development can be observed using this technique
Best used to encourage children in taking more cognitive challenges
Learning Stories
This can help to increase imagination power
New stories of different genre and category need to be a part of the curriculum
Developmental Checklist
This is the record for measuring every child’s progress in the due course of a curriculum
Use multiple criteria in the developmental checklist to ensure that a child is given every part of education
Event Sample
An event sample would be recorded each time a child exhibits signs of aggressive behaviour and any causal factors.
These would be used as an on-demand tool, recording incidents that are unplanned but directly observed.
Running Record
This is the record of everyday activities of a child in a specific time period
Keep daily running record in order to improve the observation upon a child
Time Sample/Sociogram
This is the measure of behaviour of a child any particular time period depending upon the external situation
Maintain proper communication with every child to understand their behaviour and circumstances each child has gone through
What report-writing standards and protocols should you follow when writing observation reports?

It is important to follow the ethics and guidelines by National standard and their relevant framework. The protocol should have the prohibition of using proper observation that could be used by educators to note down important points related to children. Proper clarity should be maintained with communication with children which can help them to provide quality information
There are certain organisational standards, policies and procedures that are relevant to the gathering of information about a child to inform practice. Name the relevant standard, frameworks, convention and code that applies. (There are five in total).

a) Gathering information about children Early Years Learning FrameworkPrinciples Collaborative partnerships with families and communities Governance and leadership Secure, respectful and reciprocal relationships
Name the relevant policies.

b) Educational program and practice
Name the relevant procedures.

c) Children’s health and safety
Part D – Respectful and Positive with children
There are a range of things you need to take into consideration if you want to communicate effectively. Complete the table below listing 2 verbal and 2 non-verbal things you need to take into consideration when communicating with children and their families.

Verbal communication considerations
Non-verbal communication considerations
Older pre-schoolers discussing how to redesign a bed and dolls
Recognise and reinforce appropriate behaviour
Show confidence in childrem
Use proper observations that can be identified by child
List 5 examples of how you can interact and communicate positively and respectfully with children throughout their day and provide examples of what those interactions would be. Guidance: Make sure you identify routine times as well as play times in your examples and include how you would communicate over lunch. Include an example of how you would respond to distress in ways to meet the child’s need. Include verbal and non-verbal communication techniques in your answer.

Time of day
Example of interaction
Sample answer: Arrival time
Smile and greet child and adult, begin speaking with the child about the day
Morning arrival
Simle and greet
Lunch time
Help children with food
Play time
help children with safety and play equipments
Learnimg time
Help children with learning content
Listening time
Make children to sit quitely
Describe 3 different ways you can respond in a sensitive, respectful and collaborative way when communicating with children about their interests, stories and ideas. Guidance: Include verbal and non- verbal methods of communication.

Observe the children and allow them to make their choice of selecting stories
Use informal form of communication to make children understand the importance of story
make sure that the children is able to understand the importance of the story and relate the same with their real life
Describe 3 different techniques to guide children’s behaviour and how you would apply each in the centre.

The educator can become a role model, where they will use their own behaviour to guide the children. Also it is important to ensure that children are able to carefully observe their behaviour.
Provide honest feedback to the children in their own language about the impact of their behaviour. It is important to you sympathy in the given case that is needed to convince the child in showcasing good behaviour.
Provide positive feedback when a child is showcasing good behaviour. This can help to encourage and incentivize the child improve upon their existing behaviour and understand the importance of showing good behaviour
All centres are required to have a policy that outlines strategies that will be used to guide children’s behaviour as stated in the Education and Care Services National Regulations 2011. What organisational policies, procedure and guidelines would be in place to assist you in developing limits and consequences for inappropriate behaviours? Which section of the above regulations are you required to follow and what does it state? How does this meet the requirements of upholding a child’s rights under the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child?

a) National Quality Standards (NQS)
b) Education and Care Services National Regulations
c) United nations Convention states that all children have the right to an education that lays a foundation for the rest of their lives, maximises their ability, and respects their family, cultural and other identities and languages. The above mentioned starndards are made with the same policies that can help to provide equal opputunities for all child in respect of their background
Part E – Support Behaviour
Describe at least 5 (5) characteristics of a safe and supportive environment.

1.Develop positive and respectful relationships with children 2. Support the holistic development of children in early childhood 3. Use information about children to inform practice 4. Provide better experience to support children’s play and learning
Fill out the table below: Identify one contributing environmental factor that may affect development and behavior for each of the examples. Provide a practice you could use to minimize the factors affects for each of the examples.

Environmental Factor
Practice
Children with a physical disability
Stressful factors
Remove the stress by providing relaxing environment
Children with a learning difficulty
Poor communication
Psycological conselling session by children
Children with a mental health issue
Trauma at personal level
Better communication practice that can help in understanding of issues
List at least four (4) potential impacts on the behaviour of each of these above groups, by not implementing safe, supportive and equitable practices?
1. Behaviour to provide physical support 2. Use of behaviour in professional education technique 3. Use of behaviour by showing compassion towards the child
A child in the group has a new baby at home and must keep quiet and play outside at home. List three ways in which this could this affect the child’s behavior at the centre?
1. The child could feel neglected and isolated 2. It could develop a sense of jealousy of the child towards the new baby 3. Sibling rivalry would arise from a young age
Discuss four (4) impacts the environment and culture has on the behavior of children.
1. Culture could affect the way communication is done with children 2. Culture could also have an impact and learning techniques and practices being implemented 3. Culture could also impact the way children is able to gather information about the external environment
4. Culture can have a significant impact on the belief system of a children as they grow into adulthood
     
     
Describe in your own words: positive reinforcement Why you would use positive reinforcement
a) Positive reinforcement is the act of implementing positive behaviour within the environment which can help in better communication and building healthy relationships. It can also help to motivate people within the environment and help them to participate in collective work.
b) Positive environment is needed to build better quality relationships and motivate people in learning new skills. People are also able to better communicate and practice new system
Describe three (3) positive support strategies involving communication that you could use to redirect behaviors of concern.
Use of clear communication method
Use compassion to understand others point of view
Use of emotional intelligence to better understand and emotional aspect of other peoples in communication
Discuss how you would diffuse the following hypothetical situation: ‘Two children are yelling at each other, one of the children is holding a book about to throw it at the other.’
Make the children understand the importance of developing friendship and resolve conflict. opportunities to both the children which can help to reduce confusion.
Describe in your own words how culture and the environment can impact on the behaviour of children.
External culture can help to provide different types of inputs in learning elements of children. culture believing in open practice encourages children to gain new skills depending upon their area of interest. While orthodox culture enforces children to not break any traditional protocol in their part of development. It is always important to use new type of methods in every culture with passing generation to improve the learning process of children
What is disruptive behaviour?
Disruptive behaviour is the act of showing aggressiveness and I temper towards other people in the society. Showing disruptive behaviour in front of children can cause disturbance in their mental growth. In a childcare setting, disruptive behaviour disrupts the class or other children within the group from learning or participating in play
What is meant by ‘behaviours of concern’?
Behaviour of concern is considered to be a potentially dangerous kind of attitude that can increase the risk of injury and an unethical attitude towards others. This can also be described as destructive behaviour which can cause damage to the property.
What are the main differences between disruptive behaviours and ‘behaviours of concern’?
Disruptive behaviour is caused when a child is non-cooperative towards others. Behaviour of concern is a challenging behaviour which can cause high level of risk among other children
Rewrite the following instructions using positive language, so that they become positive communication behaviour expectations.

I’ve told you a million times Sienna, don’t run inside.
I have convinced Sienna the train running inside could cause her injury
Boys are so destructive. Stop throwing the books, Isaac!
Issac don’t be a bad boy books are good for you don’t throw them
Don’t snatch the toys, Sam.
Sam, please don’t take toys, you have your own toys let others also play
Describe an activity that would allow children to explore each of the following symbol systems with children in your centre: Letters Numbers Time Money Musical Notation

Activity 1 – Letters:Figures with real life image
Activity 2 – Numbers:
Easy maths and puzzle games
Activity 3- Time:
Esay clock with picture and time game
Activity 4- Money:
Incentives as a prize of each games
Activity 5 – Musical Notation:
Playful music and musical chairs
Case Study A – Holistic Development
Download the linked scenario and answer the questions below.Scenario – Kurt Sampson Kurt is 6 years old.  He has recently enrolled at the School Age Care service where you work as an assistant educator.  Kurt is one of several children his age at the service and he attends each day both before and after he goes to school.  The lead educator you work with lets you know that Kurt’s parents have recently separated and while there are no parenting orders in place, his mother did say that things had been ‘messy’ leading up to the separation.  Kurt’s mother is the parent you will have the most contact with as his father works away. Kurt presents as a very quiet and withdrawn child – not unusual for a new enrolment.  You and your colleagues ‘buddy’ him up with one of the other children his age and work hard to help him feel comfortable at the service.   You are careful to find out what his likes and interests are to help him engage with the resources and other children.  After one month, Kurt still has not formed any friendships amongst his peers and generally only engages with the educators if they speak to him first.  His mother says that he is becoming a little withdrawn at home as well.  You begin to suspect that there may be an issue with Kurt’s current emotional / psychological state.
Write a paragraph to describe your concerns about Kurt and what steps, as an assistant educator you would need to take to respond to those concerns. Guidance: Make sure you include details of how you will record and report your suspicions and how you would share information with colleagues regarding Kurt’s development and wellbeing.

Separation of parents at a very young age of children can be a very disturbing activity. Not getting equal opportunity for love from both the parents and witnessing violence between them can have a lifelong negative impact. In this case the educator Kurt encouraged him to spend more time with his fellow children. Should also be given a mental psychological counselling session, where it will be possible to understand the real mental status of the child after witnessing the separation of his parents. Positive reinforcement activities should be encouraged and the child needs to take part in every positive activities which can help him to to recover from the mental trauma of parents divorce
As a result of your actions, you and your colleagues work with Kurt’s mother to develop strategies that will help him express his feelings and to encourage him to socialise with the other children at the service. List at least 3 strategies that could be used to encourage Kurt to express his feelings.

1. Have proper communication and allow Kurt to express his feeling 2. Let Kurt spend time separately with his mum and dad depending upon their availability 3. Held regular meetings with the parents and convince them to show positive reinforcement behaviour towards their child
List at least 3 strategies that could be used to support Kurt to socialise with the other children in the group.

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1. Encourage him to participate in group activities and play 2. encourage him to take active participation in all communication program 3. Encourage other children to ensure that Kurt is included in every cultural activities
List the National Quality Standard and elements that link to this practice.

National Quality Standard for postive external environment
State the code and the convention that applies in this situation.

Co-parenting code of conduct can be used to ensusre the child gets support of both parents even after their diveorce
Case Study B – Develop positive and respectful relationships with children
Scenario One (1) : Collaborating with childrenRead the following scenario and answer the questions below.You are one of the educators working with a group of 24 pre-school aged children at Sparkling Stars Childcare Centre. At Sparkling Stars there is a very strong focus on collaborating with the children to build their ideas into the program each day.Each day in the Preschool Room starts with a ‘Morning Conference’ where the children are invited to share their ideas for what they would like to do for the day.Question 1. Imagine you are running the Morning Conference. How will you ensure there is enough time for all the children to express their ideas? Which alternatives can you provide to the children that have difficulty expressing themselves in front of the whole group? How will you make sure you acknowledge each child’s contributions? How will you encourage children to share their stories and ideas?
a) Groups can be formed with small number of children, where it is possible for the educator to provide attention to to individual students
b) Personal counselling sessions where children will be encouraged to provide their own opinion and issues
c) Appreciate children for every small achievements they make in regards to their daily activities and learning lessons
d) Make every child feel special so that they are able to earn compassion and respect the educator
Question 2. At this Morning’s Conference, Jackson has an idea to build a rocket which appeals to most of the children in the group. As you discuss Jackson’s idea, a lot of other suggestions are added – some of them unsuitable for the care situation.Describe how you will explain to the children that their suggestions are not suitable. Write a description of how you will explore alternative options with those children. Write 2-3 paragraphs to describe how you will assist the children in making their ideas a reality.
a) Make them understand the risks involved in the situation which can cause potential injury to the children
b) Provide them options with alternative playing games which can be equally compelling and attractive to the children mmmm
c) It is important to encourage every child in taking their individual part of dream depending upon their area of interest. Unless the activities done by the children do not cause any harm to themselves of the society, as an educator it is the duty to encourage such activities. Children should be also given examples of inspirational stories, which will motivate team to take extra initiative in fulfilling their dreams. Motivating them also during the time of failure is essential as in early child days it is quite easy to be discouraged. During this time it is important to assess that children depending on their potential and do not impose any traditional rules. Showing of support every time with proper composition and communication is a best way to make children increase their confidence level. At the same time it is also important to ensure that no form of negative activities would have impact on the mental development of the children.
Question 3. During the discussions you had with the children, they showed an interest in finding out where all their friends’ families come from. You decide it is a great opportunity to build multicultural cooking experiences into the program for all the children. Some of the younger children are a little hesitant about trying new things.Describe at least 2 strategies you could use to encourage the children to participate in the multicultural cooking experiences.

1. Making them cook easy and tasty items, which would encourage children and develop their interest in cooking 2. Ensure that they do not use any hazardous items like fire and use simple recipes which do not involve any high level of physical activities
Case Study C – Understanding Children Behaviour
Meet Jake. Jake is now 5 years old. He just started going to Sparkling Stars Childcare Centre and has been assigned to your care. You had a talk with his mother, Emilia, to learn more about Jake. You found out that Emilia had just separated with her husband after several years in an abusive relationship. She had serious concerns for Jake’s safety and how it was impacting him, and decided it was best for them to move out.
Now Emilia is taking care of Jake on her own as she works full-time as an admin assistant for an accounting firm. She often has to work until late and has arranged for the school bus to send Jake to the childcare centre after his school until she can pick him up on her way home from work.Scenario 1: Despite what he has gone through, Jake is a happy and playful kid. He likes being around other kids and has no problems meeting new people. However, during his first week at the centre, it was observed that Jake has violent tendencies when having disagreements with the other kids in the centre. He was caught hitting another kid and using bad language while fighting over some Lego blocks. You have had a talk to Jake about his behavior and how it is not right to use violence and bad words, however, he started to panic in fear of being punished for his bad behaviour. His heartbeat started to race and he started to breathe heavily and sweat profusely. He stopped responding to your questions until he calmed down a few minutes after the incident.

This behaviour raised your concern and made you decide to discuss it with your supervisor. Simulate a dialogue with your supervisor by creating a video recording of yourself discussing your concerns about Jake. You may do it as a monologue or you may invite a friend to play the part of your supervisor. Keep your recording less than 5 minutes long.Guidance: To ensure successful completion of the relevant requirements for this task, include the following information in your discussion: Identify areas of concern Recognise any possible developmental challenges or mental health issues of Jake that may have potential impacts on his behaviour Identify possible contributing environmental factors Share your recommendation in determining when to involve other staff for supported intervention
Scenario 2: After the incident on Jake’s first day in the centre, you decided to conduct further research on Jake’s case to be able to understand and assist him better. For the rest of the week, you recorded your observations on Jake’s behaviour: On the second day, Jake fought with other kids in the centre twice during the day. Both fights started over a disagreement while playing games. Jake does not like losing and often resorts to name calling and hitting when he cannot have his way. When you talked to him about his behaviour, he displayed severe signs of anxiety and frustration and ended up isolating himself for the rest of the day. On the third day, Jake had a fight with another kid in the centre over losing a group race because one of his teammates did not follow the race instructions correctly. He blamed his teammate for losing the game and used bad language to express his frustration. On the fourth day, Jake pushed Lisa, a 5 year old girl who also goes to the centre, after she refused to share her snacks with him. When Lisa started crying and telling Jake she would tell her mum what he did, Jake started to panic and started crying himself. On the fifth day, Jake had a fight again with some of the kids because they didn’t want to include him in their games. Jake started throwing things at them and when you tried to calm him down, he started having another severe panic attack.

Collect and record the data presented in the case study using the questionnaire provided below: What behaviour have you identified as a source of concern? Provide a brief description. The aggressive and disrespectful behaviour of Jake is the primary cause of concern. The source for this kind of disruptive behaviour is for witnessing violence in family which can have a negative impact on the children. How frequent to you observe this behaviour? High frequency of this destructive attitude would be a matter of grave concern How much does this behaviour affect the child’s relationships? Describe the intensity of the behaviour. This negative attitude would be a long last in the social life of the child as every other children will develop a sense of negative attitude and it will not be possible to create a healthy relationship in societyBehaviours that require support: Based on your observations, identify Jake’s behavior/s that may require additional support.
Showing compassion and positive reinforcement is highly necessary as it will help to convince the child about the positive sides of the external environment
Research about the behavior identified and provide two possible methods to provide support to Jake: Jake could be given mental counselling session Convince other child to act normally with Jake and ensure they do not show any Revenge attitude
Create a report offering your findings from your observation as additional support to your supervisor:
Use the template provided below to write your report: Title:       Summary:       Introduction:       Body:       Conclusion:       Recommendations:      
Guidance: Title: Indicate topic/main findings Summary: The message of your report Outline of your: methods, findings, conclusions, implications, recommendations. Introduction: Aim, scope and limitations Background or context May include an overall answer Outline of report structure Body: Provides justification for recommendation(s) Presents methods and findings Is based on evidence Keeps the discussion concise Conclusion: Restates position/key message Presents and evaluates possible solutions Recommendations: Suggests appropriate policy/actions
Project – Observing, Gathering and Analysing Information
Assessment Requirements: To complete this project, you will need access to: A Regulated childcare centre Three children of varying ages attending the childcare centre The children’s families for discussion Samples of children’s work Important: You are required to complete this project in a childcare setting as an educator through vocational placement or direct employment. Project Overview: This project requires you to observe, document and analyse information regarding three children of varying age in the centre. This project is divided into four parts: Gathering and recording information Analysing observations of the children’s behaviour Writing reports Contributing to program planning

Part 1: Gathering and recording information Select three children of varying ages from the childcare centre and follow the steps below: Step 1: Gather and record their information using the forms provided in the link below: Childcare Templates
(http://compliantlearningresources.com.au/network/sparkling-stars/?p=2342) (Download Childcare Information Sheet)
Guidance: To ensure successful completion of this step, make sure you follow the instructions below: Secure consent to interview from the parents. Download Consent to Interview Form here: Childcare Templates Interview parents of three children attending the childcare centre The three children must be of varying age One form must be completed for each child Submit the completed forms with this workbook

Step 2: Talk and interact with the children and record your observations.For children 2 years old and above: Give the child drawing supplies (ensure drawing supplies are child-friendly) Have the child draw a picture. Have the child describe and explain the drawing. During the entire exercise make sure to jot down your observations regarding the child’s personality and behaviour Scan the child’s work and save it in his records Use the form provided in the link below to record your observations: Childcare Templates
(http://compliantlearningresources.com.au/network/sparkling-stars/?p=2342) (download Child Observation Form A)For infants to 1 year old: With the assistance of the parent, interact with the child and record your observations based on: Anecdotal information Stories/Accounts from the parent Use the form provided in the link below to record your observations: Child Observation Form B
(NOTE: Download Child Observation Form B using this link.)
Part 2: Analysing observations of the children’s behavior Based on your observations, provide an analysis of the children’s behaviour. Use the space provided below to discuss your analyses:
Child 1
Name of Child: S
Age:      
Did you identify any behaviour that will require special support for the child? Yes | No If yes, please explain:      
Describe the frequency, intensity and duration of the behaviour of the child that requires support:      
Describe an aspect of the child’s development as reflected by your observation:      
Describe an aspect of the child’s knowledge, ideas, abilities and interests as reflected by your own observation:      
Child 2
Name of Child:      
Age:      
Did you identify any behaviour that will require special support for the child? Yes | No If yes, please explain:      
Describe the frequency, intensity and duration of the behaviour of the child that requires support:      
Describe an aspect of the child’s development as reflected by your observation:      
Describe an aspect of the child’s knowledge, ideas, abilities and interests as reflected by your own observation:      
Child 3
Name of Child:      
Age:      
Did you identify any behaviour that will require special support for the child? Yes | No If yes, please explain:      
Describe the frequency, intensity and duration of the behaviour of the child that requires support:      
Describe an aspect of the child’s development as reflected by your observation:      
Describe an aspect of the child’s knowledge, ideas, abilities and interests as reflected by your own observation:      
Sample
Name of Child: Benjamin Biggs
Age: 5
Did you identify any behaviour that will require special support for the child? Yes | No If yes, please explain: The violent nature of his drawing is something I find very disturbing and I believe requires further evaluation from an expert.
Describe the frequency, intensity and duration of the behaviour of the child that requires support: Throughout the day within the next 3 days, I asked Benjamin to keep drawing things that interests him. In all occasions, he drew pictures that showed his interest for violence and killing animals. In all cases, the pictures he drew are very bloody and gruesome.
Describe an aspect of the child’s development as reflected by your observation: Benjamin demonstrated normal cognitive and motor skills throughout the exercise. He was able to understand the instructions and he was able to perform the tasks without any difficulty.
Describe an aspect of the child’s knowledge, ideas, abilities and interests as reflected by your own observation: Benjamin is a smart kid. The way he communicates and explains his ideas is very clear and elaborate. He likes drawing. When he draws he is completely immersed and focused in the task.
Part 3: Writing Reports Write a report summarizing your findings for the three children. You may use any format as long as the following information are included in your report: For each of the three children interviewed and observed, you must provide: A summary of the interview/observation session conducted with the child A summary of your observations A summary of your findings Your recommendations Submit a soft copy of your report along with the completed forms from Parts 1 and 2.
Part 4: Contributing to program planning Based on your findings and recommendations, create a childcare program for each of the child interviewed and observed. Your childcare program should provide guidance on how the childcare centre will nurture the children’s development. It should demonstrate how the centre will offer experiences that will help the children learn about themselves and the world around them. Your program should include: Planned activities Materials, equipment and staff Interactions between the children and providers and among other children in the centre Your curriculum must reflect your observations of each of the child’s needs, strengths and interests. It should build new experiences and expectations based on the children’s background. The program should allow educators to be intentional in the methods used to support the children’s needs. If available, you may use the template provided by the centre, or you may use the template provided in the link below: Childcare Templates
(http://compliantlearningresources.com.au/network/sparkling-stars/?p=2342) (Download Childcare Program Planning Sheet)
Workbook Checklist
When you have completed this assessment workbook, review the candidate’s assessment against the checklist below: The candidate has completed all the assessments in the workbook: Knowledge Assessment Part A Part B Part C Part D Part E Case Study A Case Study B Case Study C ProjectIMPORTANT REMINDER Candidates must achieve a satisfactory result to ALL assessment tasks to be awarded COMPETENT for the units relevant to this cluster.To award the candidate competent in the units relevant to this subject, the candidate must successfully complete all the requirements listed above according to the prescribed benchmarks.
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