Reflective Practice Self-Assessment Professional Practice and Research Active reading

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Reflective Practice Self-Assessment Score each item: 0 = none / 1 = some / 2 = a lot
Page
1of 2
1. How much you reflect on events:
Reflective Practice is a deliberate way of
thinking about experiences: to learn from
mistakes; to identify skills and strengths;
and develop options and actions for change
and future success. Reflective Practice is
more than recording training for continuing
professional development (CPD). Instead, it
links reflection and action together, to
promote critical thinking for new knowledge
and insights, enabling lifelong learning and
development.
This self-assessment quiz will help you
examine the ways you use reflection in your
personal and professional life, and consider
the extent to which you use reflective
activities for learning and self-development.
Interpreting your scores
There are a maximum 60 points available (5
sections, each of 6 questions = 30
questions, max 2pts each).
Reflective Practice total score summary
0-20 – low interest/opportunity for RP
21-40 – good potential for using RP
41-60 – strong potential for using/improving
RP
The individual elements and section scores
indicate where you should direct your efforts
to improve your Reflective Practice potential
and capabilities. See ‘What your section
scores mean’ on page 2.
The philosopher Donald Schon wrote about
“…a dialogue of thinking and doing through
which I become more skillful…” (1983). He
asserted that Reflective Practice can lead to
learning and professional excellence. Many
other theorists describe levels of reflective
thinking that enable us to attain deep
learning. Linda Lawrence-Wilkes and Dr Lyn
Ashmore, authors of The Reflective
Practitioner in Professional Education
(2014), advocate the value of Reflective
Practice to achieve innovative thinking, and
excellence in life and work.
I make decisions about events as they happen.
I change my behaviour or actions as events happen.
I think about events and reasons for actions afterwards.
I talk to others about events/behaviour afterwards.
I think proactively after events to plan future action.
I research/investigate issues to solve problems.
Total of section 1.
2. Your use of reflection methods/tools:
I write notes which I review (e.g., diary, journal).
I talk with others about events / issues.
I explore theories, models, etc., relating to my issues.
I seek/get feedback from others about events/issues.
I make image/sound record of events/issues.
I observe events and situations that involve me.
Total of section 2.
3. Considering other points of view:
I understand my ‘self’ views – subjective and objective.
I empathise with colleagues’/others’ viewpoints.
I seek standpoints of external theories and concepts.
I look for relevant discussion (article, conference, etc).
I look at research / evidence.
I try to make objective sense of social media.
Total of section 3.
4. Your questioning of assumptions:
I question my own ideas and beliefs.
Other people’s points of view.
About task-related problems.
How and why I think the way I do (metacognition).
Books, newspapers, TV, etc.
Internet information.
Total of section 4.
5. Your ability/freedom to reflect:
I have time or make time to reflect.
I have necessary reflection knowledge/methods/tools.
I overcome any self-imposed barriers, habits.
I understand how/why I think as I do (metacognition).
I am sufficiently empowered personally/at work.
I am free of negative influence by others.
Total of section 5.
Total of all five sections.
© L Lawrence-Wilkes & A Chapman/Businessballs 2015. This Reflective Practice self-assessment instrument was developed by Linda
Lawrence-Wilkes and Alan Chapman. It may be used freely in self-development, teaching/developing others, and research, but may
not sold, or published without permission, and is not to be replicated online. The instrument and various supporting guidance and
theoretical information are available at www.businessballs.com/reflective-practice.htm. Sole risk with user. Based on Lawrence-Wilkes’
Art of Reflection Quiz, Lawrence Wilkes & Ashmore, The Reflective Practitioner in Professional Education, 2014.
1. How much you reflect on events:
0-6
2. Your use of reflection methods/tools:
0-6
Your
score
Your
score
You tend to reflect in action, reacting to wha
around you. This may involve quick reflectiv
you are involved in an event or experience.
action immediately in response to the situati
valuable way to reflect on and learn from ev
occur.
7-12
You tend to reflect on action, afterwards, a
and deliberate process (than in action). You
review events think about the reasons for ac
behaviour, and/or seek other’s views. You p
theory and research, to investigate practical
planning future action for problem solving an
is moving from basic reflection towards a cri
improve professional competence and indep
thinking.
Notes:
t is happening
e thinking as
You may take
on. This is a
ents as they
ore thoughtful
are likely to
tions or
erhaps examine
issues,
d change. This
tical outlook, to
endent
You tend to use traditional reflection for prof
development/CPD. You perhaps could chall
core values and beliefs and use additional w
Books, research, media could offer opportun
on a wider body of knowledge, and access e
specific issues. Seeking more feedback cou
perspectives.
7-12
You take advantage of a range of reflective
a deeper understanding to examine and info
You tend to step outside your comfort zone t
feedback, be self-critical, examine assumpti
theory and challenge the status quo. Develo
reflective learning skills make you a more su
round learner.
Notes:
essional
enge more your
ays to reflect.
ities to reflect
xpertise on
ld reveal new
activities to gain
rm your work.
o ask for
ons, question
pment of these
ccessful all
Your
score
3. Considering other points of view:
0-6
4. Questioning assumptions:
0-6
Your
score
You tend not to analyse yourself or others, p
move on and do things. ‘Learning by doing’ i
effective way to learn (see Kolb’s theory,198
you will become a better learner using more
learning, especially seeking a ‘helicopter vie
seek more ways to reflect on your own need
and more awareness of other people’s pers
7-12
You tend to take a wider reflective stance in
through other ‘lenses’. You examine your ow
perspectives, and reflect on rational argume
research, for an objective fuller view. Engagi
reflection you tend to express self-awarenes
and listen – enablers of emotional and intelle
Notes:
referring to
s a very
4), however
ways of
w’. You could
s and skills,
pectives.
seeing yourself
n and other
nt, theory and
ng in critical
s, to empathise
ctual growth.
You tend to accept yourself and other peopl
rather than challenge. If you do not question
values and beliefs, because this feels threat
self-identity), seeking feedback from others
more objective self-criticism. You could look
hidden assumptions in other people’s views,
expressed in the media, books, research, et
7-12
You are likely to be aware of your own and o
beliefs and attitudes. You tend to examine y
and challenge status quo elsewhere. Your te
towards deeper reflections will enable progr
and wider learning.
Notes:
e/sources,
your own
ening (it links to
could assist
more for
and views
c.
ther’s values,
our own beliefs
ndencies
essively deeper
5. Your ability/freedom to reflect:
0-6
Your
score
This self-assessment tool is a fine example of using
Reflective Practice. Completing the questionnaire,
analysing the results, and deciding to take some
action, demonstrates that you are starting the process
of putting Reflective Practice to powerful effect.
© L Lawrence-Wilkes & A Chapman/Businessballs 2015. This is
page 2 of the Reflective Practice self-assessment instrument
developed by Linda Lawrence-Wilkes and Alan Chapman. It may
be used freely in self-development, teaching/developing others,
and research, but may not sold, or published without permission,
and is not to be replicated online. The instrument and various
supporting guidance and theoretical information are available at
www.businessballs.com/reflective-practice.htm. Sole risk with
user. Based on Lawrence-Wilkes’ Art of Reflection Quiz, Lawrence
Wilkes & Ashmore, The Reflective Practitioner in Professional
Education, 2014.
Barriers of time, resources or lack of autono
restrict reflective activities. You could explor
limits that are self-imposed or external. Simp
time management changes can help, and qu
assumptions (section 4).
7-12
You are likely to overcome barriers to reflect
enable progressively improving learning and
Notes:
my tend to
e and test any
le
estioning
ing, which will
growth.
What your section scores mean… Reflective Practice Self-Assessment page 2 of 2

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